Course Descriptions

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-A-

A Biblical Panorama, EX-BI 407-(3)-T2
This is a study of a general overview of the Bible in its many components. This course is designed to provide the student with a solid foundation for understanding the Bible in its literary, historical, cultural, and canonical elements. Reading both the Bible and supporting texts and collateral articles, the student will gain a deeper understanding of this sacred and ancient document and how it impacts the modern world.

A History of Minorities in the U.S., SS-HI 344-(2)-FA
Beginning with the treatment of Native Americans by Spanish and English colonists, this course will proceed through the treatment of African slaves, and include perspectives on the experience of Hispanic and Asian immigrants. Social, economic, and legal perspectives will be emphasized. (Offered alternate years)

Abnormal Psychology, SS-PY 330-(3)-SP
Students will be exposed to the DSM-IV (diagnostic manual) and all psychological disorders from a multiperspective. They will study many disorders, all disorders presently listed in the DSM-IV, as well as case studies of disorders.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110- G-- General Psychology.(Offered alternate years.)

Accompanying, MU-MS 365-G-(2)-FA, SP
A student who is majoring in a piano performance and/or is on a music scholarship for piano will be required to take four semesters of accompanying. The student must accompany a major performing group (chorale or choir) and two private applied lesson students. if the student is accompanying the choir or the chorale, they must sign up for accompanying and may NOT sign up for choir, chorale, or the ministry during the same semester. The student will be required to be at a certain number of lessons of the performer to whom they are assigned, as well as, to spend rehearsal time outside of lessons. Every two weeks the student must have an extra half-hour added to his/her piano lesson to allow the instructor to hear and critique the accompaniment pieces. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: The student must be performing at an intermediate level in piano and concurrently taking applied piano lessons; and/or the consent of the instructor.

Accounting-(3)
Introduces fund accounting as it applies to governmental units and such non-profit entities as colleges and universities, hospitals, health and welfare organizations, and churches. Topics focus on accounting for the general fund, special funds, and account groups and how those accounting systems differ from general accounting approaches learned elsewhere in the curriculum. Prerequisite: BUS 320.

Acting I, CO-TH 107-G-(3)-FA
Practical introduction to the art and technic of acting. Contemporary study of character development. Required for Drama emphasis.

Acting II, CO-TH 208-G-(3)-FA
Advanced studies in the technics of acting, concentrating on scenes from realistic plays as a device for the development of technics of voice and body for acting.
Prerequisite: C 107 or instructor’s permission.

Action Research Project, EX-OR 465-(4)-T1, T2, T4
The Action Research Project is a major research effort designed to enhance knowledge in an area
related to one’s work or community and provide research skills to assist in effective decision making. The adult learner completes a research project related to his/her employment environment. Statistical analysis concepts and methods assist the adult learner in identifying a topic, collecting data, and measuring results. A college faculty member monitors the progress of the independent study, and an on-site contact makes certain that the adult learner devotes at least 200 clock hours to the project. An oral report of initial project findings is given by each adult learner in this term.

Acts, PR-BI 208-G-(2)-FA
An inductive study into the early apostolic history of the church, with special attention given to the operation of the Holy Spirit in the lives of the early leaders.

Adaptive Physical Education, SP-SH 312-(2)-SP
Methods of classification of exceptional students, program planning and teaching of activities appropriate to needs of the handicapped are examined.

Administration and Organization of Physical Education Sport & Fitness, SP-SH 425-(3)-FA
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative duties, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative skills useful in the successful administration of athletic, school health, and physical education programs.

Adult Development & Life Assessment, EX-PY 301-(3)-T1
This course introduces adult learners to adult development theory and links these concepts to life through a process of individual reflection. Both classical and contemporary adult development theory are examined. These theories then provide the paradigm for self-analysis and life assessments, the basis for understanding individuals within organizations.

Advanced Accounting, BS-AC 436 (MC)-(3)-FA
Attention focuses on ownership, realignment, dissolution and liquidation of partnerships, followed by problems associated with mergers and acquisitions. Included is the preparation and analysis of consolidated financial statements, corporate reorganization, personal financial statements, bankruptcy, estates, and trusts.
Prerequisites: BUS 321, BUS 322.

Advanced Acting, CO-TH 490-G-(3)-FA
Advanced studies and practice in the techniques of acting, exploring all genres and acting methods. Prerequisites: C 208-G or instructor’s permission. (Offered alternate years.)

Advanced Analysis, NS-MA 311 (MC)-(3 or 5)-FA
A study of fundamental concepts of analysis, functions of bounded variation, integration, sequences of functions. Fourier series, functions of a complex variable.
Prerequisite: MA 212 with a grade of C or better. (Offered odd years)

Advanced Calculus

Advanced Composition, EN-CP 405-G-(3)-FA (3 year cycle)
An in-depth study of analytical and argumentative writing using critical thinking and research skills to focus on American popular culture and values from a Christian worldview. Prerequisites: E 104-G and sophomore standing.

Advanced Creative Writing, EN-CP 410-G-(4)-WI (2 year cycle)
Students will research requirements for submission of manuscripts and then submit manuscripts for publication.
Prerequisite: E 310 Creative Writing.

Advanced Drawing/Advanced Painting (Directed Study, HU-AR 390/490-G)-(1-2)-FA, WI, S

Advanced Grammar, EN-CP 402-G-(3)
An in-depth study of the linguistics and grammar of the English language as spoken in the United states. Traditional, structural, and transformational analysis will be utilized to study the more complex and subtle constructions of American English.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Advanced Literacy Instruction and Assessment
A study of the literacy development of the intermediate-grade child. Examines the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to effectively assess and instruct children in the development of higher-level literacy skills. Emphasis is placed on formal and informal diagnosis and interpretation, planning and implementing instructional activities, and the use of technology to extend and support reading instruction. Focus is on applying diagnosis and remediation across the curriculum to diverse student populations.

Advanced Professional Communications, BS-MG 311-(3)-SP
This course includes in-depth discussion of current communication topics including workplace diversity, technology, correspondence applications, proposals, business plans, visual aids, teamwork, interpersonal communications, listening, nonverbal messages, presentation skills and employment communication. Positive, neutral, goodwill, negative and persuasive letters will be prepared.
Prerequisites: CO-EN 103, CO-EN 104.

Advanced Professional Communications, CO-CO 311-(3)-SP
A study of the fundamental principles of the major types of business communications (both written and oral). This includes the application of correct English, organized thinking and practical psychology in solving problems dealing with business, as well as the use of modern technology.
Prerequisite: E 103, E 104.

American Diplomacy(at McPherson College), MC-PS 356-(3)-SP
A historical survey of the diplomatic relations of the United States from the American Revolution to the present. (Offered alternating years.)

American Government, SS-PO 203-(3)-SP
A critical examination of the formal and informal institutions of American government—congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, political parties, media and interest groups—in order to understand the political policy and action of our nation. (Offered alternate years)

American Literature, EN-LT 242-G-(3)-FA (3 year cycle)
A chronological overview of the development of American literature from the founding of the country to the present. It will cover all genres of literature and include critical reading and analytical writing.

American Novel

American Presidents, SS-HI 107-G-(4)-WI
This course creatively explores the history of America through a study of incidents in the lives of the Presidents from the birth of George Washington to the present time and surveys the development of the American Presidency from the administrations of George Washington to the present. A study will be made of how we "hire and fire" Presidents, the changing powers of the President and the personal impact on the Presidency of those who have held the office. (Offered irregularly.)

An Introduction to Research and Analysis Using Statistics, EX-MG 320-(4)-T2
Problem analysis and evaluation techniques are presented. Adult learners are shown methods for defining, researching, analyzing, and evaluating a problem in their work or vocational environments that they have selected for independent study project. Specific statistical information covered in the course includes identifying and measuring objectives, collecting data, working with significance levels, and analyzing variance and constructing questionnaires.

Analytical Chemistry I

Anatomy and Physiology

Apocalyptic Literature, PR-BI 309-G-(3)-FA
This class will focus on the study of literature that has been written concerning the “end times.” Material to be studied will include Biblical literature (portions of the books of Daniel, Ezekiel, selected New Testament writings and the book of Revelation) and extra-biblical literature, both ancient and modern. (Offered alternate years.)

Apologetics &Worldview, EX-MN 402-(3)-T4
This course will study the history and importance of the discipline known as Apologetics, the defense of the Faith, while also considering how this is an ongoing concern for the Church of today. The class will be looking at the classic philosophical and theological components that are utilized in support of the faith and serve as a basis for confronting pluralism. The student will also be challenged to consider his/her own worldview and the various elements that shape it.

Applied Care Groups, PR-MN 350-(2)-FA
The small group is examined as a basic unit for discipling, evangelizing and training leaders. Students are asked to lead a campus group.

Applied Children’s Curriculum, PR-EM 353-(3)
This course will challenge the student to affectively apply teaching methodology, biblical exegesis, and critical thinking skills in reference to the Christian education of children. Students will evaluate different forms of curriculum and assess the educational structure in which these curricula are used. Students will also be encouraged to develop curriculum writing skills. (Offered on demand.)

Applied Guitar, MU-AP 131,331-G-(1)-FA, SP
This course offers beginning instruction in playing an acoustic/electric guitar. Included is a study of music fundamentals, beginning chords and their function, note-reading (playing melodies), and a variety of strumming and plucking patterns for accompanying traditional and contemporary songs.

Applied Homiletics, PR-MN 310-(3)-FA
This course will emphasize advanced learning of the mechanics and developing ideas of the speaker. The course involves the student in the theory and the practice of preaching.

Applied Percussion, MU-AP 133,333-G-(1)-FA, SP
This course studies fundamentals for the snare and trap set. The emphasis will be on individual hand and/or foot coordination and the implementation of snare drum fundamentals to the entire trap set.

Applied Piano, MU-AP 125, 325-G-(1)-FA, SP
This is designed to meet the needs of level of proficiency of each individual student, from the beginner to the advanced pianist. We will work at development of readings, technic, scales and chords. Two recitals are required each semester and five hours of practice weekly. Early intermediate students will play pieces from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary periods of music. Scales, chords, cadences, arpeggios, Hanon and Burgmuller (Opus 100 and 109) are required of all late elementary to advance students.

Applied Voice, MU-AP 123,323-G-(1)-FA, SP
This course is a private voice lessons which will include the development of the voice, tone quality, diction, and range. English, German, Italian, and French diction. Minimum repertoire requirement varies depending upon ability level of singer. Performance.

Applied Woodwinds, MU-AP 127,327-G-(1)-FA, SP
(Name of instrument to be inserted at registration) Private instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. Performance.

Art Appreciation, HU-AR 101-G-(2)-FA, SP
A survey course covering art history, art techniques, the various visual art forms and functions. It is designed to develop an understanding of and appreciation for human artistic endeavors. A general humanities course for all students as well as art majors

-B-

Badminton/Racquetball, SP-AC 132-G-(1)-FA, SP

Badminton/Tennis, SP-AC 133-G-(1)-SP

Basic Accounting, BS-AC 120
Introduces fund accounting as it applies to governmental units and such non-profit entities as colleges and universities, hospitals, health and welfare organizations, and churches. Topics focus on accounting for the general fund, special funds, and account groups and how those accounting systems differ from general accounting approaches learned elsewhere in the curriculum.

Basic Conducting, MU-MS 310-G-(2)-FA
This course is the fundamental study of conducting patterns, development of skills in choral (hymns, anthems, etc.) and instrumental conducting.
Prerequisite: MUS 103, MUS 104.

Basic Nutrition, NS-BI 245-G-(4)-WI
This course covers basic human nutritional requirements necessary for good health throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is placed on chemical makeup and sources of nutrients and how they are utilized by the body. Additional topics include weight control, nutritional information sources, nutrition and disease. This course is especially for those interested in allied health careers, family nutrition, or social service.
Prerequisites: NS-CH 102-G or NS-CH 111-G is advisable. (Offered alternate years.)

Basic Photography, HU-AR 109-G-(2)-FA, SP
Introduction to camera handling, picture taking, composition and understanding types of film available. Course includes color prints, color slides, black and white prints. Does not include darkroom studies.
Prerequisite: Camera required (35mm full manual exposure capability).

Beginning Guitar Class, MU-MS 131-G-(1)-FA, SP
This course is designed for the beginning guitar student as a prerequisite to Private Guitar. Emphasis is placed on learning guitar basics including open chords, moveable chords, music notation, reading and a variety of accompaniment techniques and playing styles. This course stresses pick and finger-style techniques development of effective practice methods, and fundamental music theory as it applies to the guitar. Students must own their own guitar.

Biblical Covenant Literature, PR-BI 204-G-(4)-WI
This course is designed to introduce the student to the inductive method of Biblical study with the practical application of learned principles in the discovery of the meaning of the Covenant in Scripture. Through the use of personal study, lecture and group discussion students will examine the Biblical, cultural background and historical traditions of the covenant in Scripture and be guided to discover the meaning of a spiritual covenant in their own lives.

Biblical Theology I, EX-BI 358-(3)-T3
This course will focus on the foundational methods upon which theology is done and the biblical core of all Christian theology. Students will engage the earliest formulations and doctrinal statements as they engage the development of theological concepts.

Biblical Theology II, EX-BI 400-(3)-T3
This course will focus on the essential doctrines of the faith. From a systematic and biblical approach, stress will be placed on such normative doctrines as God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, the Trinity, the Church, Salvation and Eschatology.

Bowling/Racquetball, SP-AC 136-G-(1)-SP

Brass Techniques, MU-MS 313-G-(1)-SP
A study of principal brass instruments. Students will learn methods in playing, caring for, and teaching them. (Offered every other year.)

British Literature I, EN-LT 304-G-(3)
This course is a chronological survey of the development of literature in Great Britain from the Middle Ages to the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century and is designed to introduce students to English literature with its history not only of steady development and continuity but also of sudden revolution and astonishing originality.

British Literature II, EN-LT 305-G-(3)
This course is a chronological survey of the development of literature in Great Britain from the Romantic Period to the Twentieth Century and after and is designed to introduce students to English literature with its history not only of steady development and continuity but also of sudden revolution and astonishing originality.

British Literature, EN-LT 442-G-(3)-FA (3 year cycle)
A chronological survey of the development of literature in Great Britain from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 20th century in all four genres. Includes critical reading and analytical writing.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

British Novel, EN-LT 417-G-(3)
This course is a chronological survey of the development of the novel in Great Britain. Study will focus on the unique elements and characteristics as illustrated through individuals works.

Business Internship, BS-AC/MG 295/395/495-(2-4)
On-the-job training in area businesses designed to provide students with practical experience in their area of interest. This is by application process only.

Business Law
, BS-MG 357-(3)-FA
This course focuses on a study of the basic legal principles governing contracts, commercial papers, sales, agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, and other commercial transactions.

Business Law, EX-MG 420-(4)-T4
Business law studies the history, background, sources and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporations and other legal entities. As a part of this module particular emphasis will be placed upon the laws governing contracts, creditors’ rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships and corporations. Today’s managers need to understand the basic legal concepts to avoid costly courtroom problems and other legal issues.

-C-

C. S. Lewis, EN-LT 307-G-(2,3)-SP (3 year cycle)
A study of representative writings of the literary scholar and famous writer, C. S. Lewis. Students have an opportunity to gain insights into literature and life values.
Prerequisite: E 103-G and E 104-G or instructor’s permission.

Calculus I, NS-MA 111-G-(4)-FA
A brief review of the real number system, differentiation and integration of polynomial functions with application, analytic geometry.
Prerequisite: M 104- G and M 105-G or instructor’s permission.

Calculus II, NS-MA 112-G-(4)-SP
A continuation of Calculus I. The course includes a study of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.
Prerequisite: M 111-G with a grade of C or better. Lab required.

Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries, SP-SH 203-(2)-WI
This course is designed to expose students to cause, immediate care, and therapy for athletic injuries. It includes lectures, field trips, and practical application in the training room atmosphere. The art and science of “taping” will be stressed. Resource material will include the Cramer self-study training techniques.

Career Exploration, ID-ST 104-(1)-SP
Designed to aid college students in making a career oriented assessment of their abilities, personality needs, interested, and strengths through the process of learning, relating, exploring, and identifying. The class also concentrates on developing successful job hunting skills and technics, including films, panel discussion, and materials on finding job openings, applying for jobs, interviewing, and writing resumes.

Cell and Molecular Biology, NS-BI 364 (MC)-(4)-SP
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies.

Ceramics I, NG-AR 131-G (MC)-(2)-FA, SP
An introduction to the production of stoneware pottery. Beginning assignments will include various forms of hand-building technics, with experience on the potter’s wheel following.

Ceramics II, NG-AR 231-G (MC)-(2)-SP
Advanced experiences in the production of functional wheel thrown stoneware pottery. Students will be directly involved with bisque and stoneware glaze firing procedures. Exposure to the aesthetic and process of raku firing is included.
Prerequisite: NG-AR 131

Certified Flight Instructor (Ground and Flying), AV-AF 401 (MA)-(4)-FA, SP
This course prepares the commercial pilot to become an instructor. Emphasis is on organization and building good performance habits as well as practical experience in flight and ground instruction. Credit is awarded after passing FAA written and practical examinations.
Prerequisite: Commercial Pilot License and Instrument Rating

Certified Flight Instructor (Instrument), AV-AF 402 (MA)-(4)-FA, SP
Successful completion of this course leads to certification as a flight instructor with instrument rating.

Child & Adolescent Development, SS-PY 307-(3)-FA
This course surveys the developmental processes and complications associated with development within the context of contemporary culture. Opportunities for observation and/or case study are included. The course is specifically designed to assist the education bound student and therefore focuses on theoretical perspectives and empirical findings relevant to the elementary and secondary classroom.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology. (Offered alternate years.)

Children’s and Adolescent Literature, EN-CP-202-G-(2)-SP
A brief overview of children’s and adolescent literature by studying the prose, poetry and illustrations of children/adolescent literature through its history, past and current trends, and its impact/uses with developing children/adolescents.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or instructor’s permission. (Offered alternate years.)

Children’s Ministry, PR-MN 325-(3)-SP
The emphasis of this course is to give the student both an understanding of what is involved in ministering to children and practical skills to carry out that ministry. (Offered alternate years.)

Choral Conducting & Rehearsal Techniques, MU-MS 312-G-(2)-SP
A continuation of MUS 310 (Basic Conducting) with an emphasis on further development of conducting techniques when directing a choral group. Emphasis will also be placed on rehearsal procedures and methods, interpretation, score reading, and analysis. Prerequisite: MUS 310. (Offered alternate years.)

Choral History & Literature, MU-MS 316-G-(2)
A survey of choral music from Bible times to the twentieth century, with emphasis on sacred music. Analysis of scores through recordings and live performances.
Prerequisite: Music History I, II, and III; or, consent of instructor.

Chorale, MU-MP 141, 342G-(1)-FA, SP
The Chorale performs for Homecoming Family Weekend, Christmas Vespers, and for chapel occasionally, and other campus events throughout the year. The repertoire includes both contemporary and traditional styles. The group rehearses two times weekly. Included in most rehearsals is instruction in rhythmic and melodic sight reading. Membership in the chorale is encouraged for those singing for pure enjoyment and those wishing to advance their choral singing skills.

Christian Worldview Studies, SS-PHL 426 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
Broadens students' understanding of the core assumptions of the Christian worldview and equips them to evaluate those assumptions in contrast with other contemporary worldviews.

Church Music Administration, MU-MS 412-G-(2)-SP
Students explore the process of developing the music program of the local church and the relationship of the minister of music to the congregation, music committee, and pastor. A graded choir program, equipment, and general organization are examined.

Church Music Practicum, MU-MS 295,395-G-(2)-SP
Practical experience in leading and administrating a music program in the church under ministerial supervision. Regularly scheduled conferences for evaluation and planning. Open to church music emphasis majors only.
Prerequisites: music theory 3, music history II, basic conducting, introduction to music technology, and two years of applied lessons.

Church Music Survey, MU-MS 309-G-(2)-FA
The student will study the history of church music across the ages to become aware of the use of music in the liturgy. From the background the student will be able to develop a working model to incorporate “psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs” (Eph. 5:19; Col. 3:9) into a worship service, as well as, an appreciation of the various genres of music that can be used in a worship setting.

Church Planting, PR-MN 351-(2)-FA
The principles of planting a church are examined and students are given the opportunity to gain practical experience. (Offered alternate years.)

Classroom Management
Classroom Management is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed for improving their instruction methods. This course will explore ways to help students develop understanding of different learning needs, provide strategies for creating classroom environments that facilitate optimal learning, utilize organizational methods that maximize instructional time, and serve as a foundation for developing a personal approach to managing a classroom.

Clinical Teaching Experience & Seminar
Clinical teaching involves the candidate performing the duties of a professional classroom instructor in an assigned school. Candidates will serve in that capacity for a minimum of 14 weeks under the supervision of the local school and a college appointee. Students will plan and teach lessons, assess students progress, supervise classroom activities, and participate in the overall school program. The CTE seminar portion of the course will involve the candidate returning to campus for a minimum of four discussion sessions with teacher education personnel and other candidates.

College Algebra, NS-MA 104-G-(3)-FA
A study of real numbers and their properties, exponents, radicals, algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities (linear and quadratic). Special emphasis is placed on the concept of the function and the graph of a function, operations of functions, and inverse functions, polynomials, and rational functions.
Prerequisite: M 103 or 1½ years of high school algebra. Students must also pass a placement exam.

College Chemistry I, II, NS-CH 111/112-G-(4)-FA, SP
This is a general inorganic chemistry course and includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab technics and procedures, and instrumentation.
Prerequisite: high school Chemistry, PS 102-G, or instructor’s approval.

College Physics I, NS-PH 215-(5)-SP
A first course for pre-engineering science and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena.
Prerequisite: NS-MA 111-G. Lab is included.

College Physics II, NS-PH 216-(5)-SP
A continuation of NS-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: NSPH 215. Lab is included.

College Trig & Analytical Geometry, NS-MA 105-G-(2)-SP
A study of angles, triangles, trigonometric functions and their graphs, and vectors. Emphasis is placed on applications of trigonometric functions.
Prerequisite: M 104-G.

Commercial Flying I, AV-AF 302 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
This course will include 65 hours of flying time (to total 190 cumulative hours), concentrating on cross country flying and advanced maneuvers required for earning the commercial license. It will take the student with an instrument rating toward the commercial license which will be granted with the successful completion of AV 303.
Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate, instrument rating, completion or concurrent enrollment in AV 301.

Commercial Flying II, AV-AF 303 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
After completing this course the student will qualify for the FAA Commercial Flight Check which is the final requirement of the course. Flight instruction in high performance aircraft and advanced maneuvers are included. Includes 60 hours of flying time to bring total to 250 hours.
Prerequisite: AV 301, AV 302.

Commercial Ground Instruction, AV-AF 301 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
This course prepares the student for the FAA Commercial Pilot written exam. Credit is awarded after passing the written exam.

Communications Practicum, CO-CO 495-(3-6)-FA, SP
The integration of classroom work and practical experience in an organized program, designed to expose students to the world of work in their area of emphasis while earning college credit on the job. Required for students with a general communications emphasis.
Prerequisite: sophomore, junior or senior standing. (See page 49.)

Computer Applications in Business I, BS-CP 235-(3, 4)-FA, WI
This course is designed to provide an interactive environment for learning the fundamental functions of the most popular commercial applications software, including word processing, spreadsheet, database management, and presentations. This course should meet the need of future business people, managers, and a generally well-informed using public.
Prerequisite: Keyboarding skill.

Computer Applications in Business II, BS-CP 335-(3)-SP
An advanced computer application course expanding the topics first introduced in BUS 235, including popular software in word processing, database, spreadsheets, and presentations. The course is designed to give the business user hands-on, real-world examples of how the software is integrated into the business decision-making process.
Prerequisites: Keyboarding skill and BUS 235 or permission of instructor.

Computer Composition and Publishing, MU-MS 303-G-(3)
Using standard PC notation software (Finale), this course will introduce the student to modern composing and arranging technics. The student will produce publisher’s quality printed music in several styles: Pop style solos, rhythm charts, contemporary ensembles and full orchestration. Prerequisite: MUS 179–G (Offered on demand.)

Computerized Accounting, BS-AC 323 -(3)-FA
Accounting processes in a computerized environment utilizing popular over-the-counter software (i.e. QuickBooks, Peachtree). Question: “If 3.7 million small businesses use QuickBooks, how many students need to learn it?” Answer: “All of them.”
Prerequisite: BS-AC 220, BS-AC 221

Concert Band, MU-MP 185,385-G-(1)-FA, SP
The Concert Band meets once a week. It performs standard concert band literature and gives 2 to 3 concerts each year.
Prerequisite: (keep original)

Concert Choir, MU-MP 143,343-G-(1)-FA, SP
The Concert Choir is a select group of 25-40voices who are auditioned at the beginning of the year. Membership is based on several factors, including overall musicianship, sight-reading ability, self-discipline, and social and emotional maturity. The Concert Choir performs both sacred and secular works which encompass a higher level of technical difficulty than that of the Chorale. The Concert Choir is a highly visible ambassador of Central Christian College, touring and performing throughout the Midwest. The group rehearses two times per week and requires a time commitment four-day Fall tour and a four-day Spring tour. Students who are chosen for Concert Choir after auditions are encouraged to take either one semester of Private Voice or one semester of Voice Class.

Contemporary Christian Music, MU-MS 401-G-(2)-FA
Students will discuss and develop an understanding of the past, present, and future of Contemporary Christian Music. Further discussion will touch on current trends in both the secular and Christian music industry. The course will include special presentations, discussion forums, reading assignments, and guest artists.

Contemporary Christian Theology, PR-TH 461-(3)-SP
A class designed to allow the student to understand the popular contemporary theologies that are current. The course will aid the student in seeing how the new views of theology fit into contemporary culture and worship experiences. Also, the student will be encouraged to compare them to traditional theology while continuing to develop a Biblical worldview.

Contemporary Culture and Worldviews, PR-PH 264-G-(3)-SP
This course will introduce the student to philosophical thought reflected in contemporary culture. Philosophies such as Postmodernism, Secular Humanism, Cosmic Humanism, Christianity, and Islam are investigated in light of their contributions to the major institutions of modern society. Applications of these philosophical perspectives are discussed in an open forum allowing for exploration and debate.

Conversational Spanish, HU-FL 110/210-G-(4)-WI
This course provides on-site opportunity for advancement in the use and fluency of the Spanish language and provides a cultural dimension which cannot be achieved in the conventional classroom. It is a constant 24-hour laboratory with trained missionaries and nationals with whom to dialog. It provides situations in which the student has the chance to buy, to worship, to sing, to converse and to question—all in the target language.
Prerequisite: FL 108 with at least a B average or two years of high school Spanish and an interview with the instructor.

Corrections, SS-CJ 342-(4)-WI
The purpose is to become knowledgeable on current correctional subsystems within the larger criminal justice system. The student will be introduced into the field of corrections and its impact on society and will be exposed to the historical precedents to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a correctional facility/office of their interest (and availability) to observe and interact with professionals in this field as part of the course work. At the conclusion, students should be able to recognize what theories relating to corrections apply to current issues and those that do not. This course is offered Interterm, and there is normally an additional fee.
(Prerequisites: approval from the instructor and be in good standing with the college.)

Cost Accounting, BS-AC 322-(3)-FA
A course focused on the study of standard costing, cash budgeting, process costing, job order costing and their application to the management decision process.
Prerequisites: BS-AC 220, BS-AC 221, BS-EC 260, BS-EC 261

Counseling, SS-PY 325-(3)-SP
A combination of theory and practice. Basic listening and counseling skills are stressed and combined with major counseling theories. Especially for ministry majors and students pursuing a career in psychology.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110- G— General Psychology or instructor's permission.

Counterpoint/Orchestration, MU-MS 325 [G](2)-SP
The study and application of scoring techniques for small and large ensembles with particular attention to tone colors and combinations of instruments. Specific attention will be given to the development and understanding of contrapuntal elements existent in music and its composition.

Creative Writing, EN-LT 310-G-(4)-WI (2 year cycle)
Concentration on student writing of poems, songs, short stories and scripts. Conventional rules and models will be studied for each genre before the student writes. Creativity will be highly encouraged.

Criminal Investigations, SS-CJ 341-(3)-SP
This course provides an introduction to the science of criminal investigation. The course will consist of lectures and class discussion, covering the historical origins and evolution of detective/investigative work, then the current method of solving crime which involves the science and art of investigating crime. Current scientific methods and how they are used in various investigations will be discussed. A "realistic" approach will be maintained to solving crime and how cases are prepared for prosecution. (Offered alternate years, evenings.)

Criminal Law, SS-CJ 340-(3)-SP
Covers the history, scope and nature of law: the parties to a crime; classification of offenses; criminal act and intent; the capacity to commit crime; and criminal defenses. It will cover the elements of all major criminal statutes.(Offered alternate years, evenings.)

Criminology, SS-CJ 240-(3)-FA
This course is a study of crime as a form of deviant behavior, nature and extent of crime, past and present theories, evaluation of prevention, control and treatment programs. (Offered alternate years, FA, evenings.)

Cross Cultural Communications CO-CO 320-(2-4)
The course is designed to examine the principles and processes of communicating from one culture to another. Through this course the student will have the opportunity to investigate domestic and international aspects of cross-cultural communication including how culture shapes values, beliefs, worldviews and behaviors. The student will also discover how these same issues impact interpersonal and mass communication. Other topics will include investigation relative to the dynamics of both verbal and nonverbal communication; barriers to communication; ethnic, racial, and other identity movements; cross-cultural immersion; cross-cultural adaptation; and cross-cultural conflict and negotiation. Furthermore, students will have opportunity to discuss strategies for practical application that will address these issues and integrate Christian values. An immersion experience in a differing culture will be used as a "laboratory" to explore how culture impacts interaction (if the course is offered during interterm).

Culturally Diverse Field Experience, ED-CC110-(1)-WI
This course requires 30 clock hours of observation and participation in a culturally and ethnically diverse school setting. The successful completion of this one hour course is required for all education majors. It is normally taken concurrently with ED 210 Introduction to Education, or offered other semesters.

Current World Problems, SS-PO 112-(3)-FA
A critical examination of international affairs and issues, evaluated in terms of historical perspective, sociological impact, international political implications, and their effect on American culture and policies. (Offered alternate years.)

-D-

Directed Readings on Contemporary & Historic Issues, PR-HS 392-(4)-WI
This course will introduce the student to quality/ classic books and articles from the seven disciplines represented in our liberal studies curriculum (philosophy & religion, physical education, science & math, business, social science, humanities and communications). Course activities will include reading, critical thinking, discussion and writing. (Offered on demand.)

Directed Study, BS-AC/MG 290/390/490-(1-4); EN-CP 390/490-G-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; MU-MS 390/490-G-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; NS-BI 390/490-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; NS-CH 390/490-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; NS-MA 390/490-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; PR-MN 390/490-(1-4); SP-SH 290/390/490-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP; SS-CJ/HI/PO/PY/SO 390/490-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP 

Drama Ministry Team, CO-TH 182/183/282/283/382/383/482/483-G-(1)-FA, SP
The Central Christian College ministry team program is one of the most outstanding opportunities available during the college years. A ministry team provides students an opportunity to develop their ministry abilities, performance skills and public presence. Each team performs two weekends a month and takes a 5-day spring tour. Current teams are: Jubilee (music), Anastasis (music) and Morning Star Review (drama).

Drawing I, HU-AR 103-G-(2)-FA, SP
This is a beginning drawing course emphasizing basic drawing principles and skills. Drawing media include pencil, pen & ink, charcoal, colored pencil and pastel.

Drawing II, HU-AR 104-G-(2)-FA, SP
This is an advanced drawing class. Using still life and nature, it will emphasize individual development and experimentation in a variety of drawing media.
Prerequisite: ART or instructor’s permission.

Ear Training, MU-MS 104-G-(1)-SP
The goal of this class is to develop the ear so that one can hear the music and be able to show what is going on through dictation and by notation. It is important to be able to hear pitch, rhythm, melody and harmony in music. This understanding will allow the student to become a complete musician.

-E-

Ear Training II, MU-MS 107-G-(1)-SP
The goal of this class is to develop the ear so that one can hear the music and be able to show what is going on through dictation and by notation. It is important to be able to hear pitch, rhythm, melody and harmony in music. This understanding will allow the student to become a complete musician.
Prerequisite: MUS 104–G.

Ear Training III, MU-MS 204-G-(4)-FA
The goal of this class is to develop the ear so that one can hear the music and be able to show what is going on through dictation and by notation. It is important to be able to hear pitch, rhythm, melody and harmony in music. This understanding will allow the student to become a complete musician.
Prerequisite: MUS 107–G.

Ear Training IV, MU-MS 207-G-(4)-SP
The goal of this class is to develop the ear so that one can hear the music and be able to show what is going on through dictation and by notation. It is important to be able to hear pitch, rhythm, melody and harmony in music. This understanding will allow the student to become a complete musician. Prerequisite: MUS 204–G.

Early Field Experience, ED-CC 120-(1)-WI
This course requires 30 clock hours of observation and participation in a school setting. The successful completion of this one hour course is required for all education majors. It is normally taken concurrently with ED 210, or offered other semesters.

Earth Science, NS-PS 104-G-(4)-WI
An introductory study of the concepts and principles of earth science, including geology, oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, and the universe and its origin. This course is required for secondary science education majors and also recommended as a general education science course.

Ecology and Natural History, NS-BI 305-G-(4)-FA
The course is designed to introduce students to basic ecological principles and the wide diversity of habitats, animal life forms and behavior patterns. It is a lab/field-oriented, general education, science class. (Offered alternate years.)

Ecology of the Southwest, NS-BI 306-G-(4)-WI
A travel course (about 4,000 miles) involving camping and field studies for 3 1/2 weeks in New Mexico and Arizona. This course covers basic ecological principles unique to the Southwestern U.S. Visits are made to unique areas of biological significance such as Carlsbad Caverns, White Sands National Monument, Saguaro National Park, the Grand Canyon, and others. It is designed for both science and non-science majors.
Prerequisite NS-BI 100 (or higher) and permission of instruction (Offered alternate years.)

Editorship I, II, III, IV, V, CO-YB 275/375/376/475/476-(1-3)-FA, WI, SP
Editorships provide opportunities in publication and production leadership for advanced and experienced journalism students.
Prerequisite: Prior selection to an editor’s position.

Educational Assessments & Statistics, ED-CC 310-(3)
An overview of the use of formal and informal assessment strategies in making decisions about learning outcomes. Additionally, a study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to education. Included will be graphic representation, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, association, and correlation.

Educational Psychology, SS-PY 336-(3)
A survey of research and theories regarding basic cognitive processes related to the extraction and utilization of information within a cultural context. The course will also study the application of psychology related to the opportunities and problems of education in a variety of educational settings and with a variety of students needs. Topics may include memory storage and retrieval, attention, imagery, mnemonic devices, decision-making, and other cognitive processes.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G-- General Psychology.

Effective Personal and Organization Communication, EX-OR 425-(3)-T1
This course investigates communication and relationships in creating a productive work environment. Effectiveness in personal and social relationships is also covered through readings and exercises involving non-verbal communication, constructive feedback, dealing with anger, and resolving conflict.

Elementary Fine Arts Methods
This course is designed to introduce the student to methods, curriculum, techniques, materials, and resources of teaching fine arts in elementary schools. Students will participate in discussion and activities that include techniques for teaching music, art, and drama, and methods of assessment to meet the diverse needs of all students. Emphasis will be on integrating fine arts methods, people, places, culture, and history to meet KSDE standards.

Elementary Greek I & II, HU-FL 201/202-G-(3)-FA,SP
Emphasizes the essentials of Koine Greek grammar and syntax. The student is enabled to read select materials in the New Testament. (Offered alternate years, Advanced Greek may be taken by the student planning on Seminary and is offered on demand.)

Elementary Language Arts Methods
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the language arts requirement of the Kansas State Department of Education. It will include instruction on oral and written expression in multiple areas such as narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive. Careful attention will be given to instructional strategies and the variety of means of assessment and evaluation of student progress. Students will be required to examine the impact of culture, family, and society on the development of language arts. Developmental issues will be addressed as they interface with language arts.

Elementary Math Methods
This course comprises the integration of math concepts, principles, and applications with sound developmental pedagogy. Participants will develop skill appropriate lessons to be presented in a classroom like setting. Assessment and evaluation procedures will be studied. Curriculums and their implementation will be investigated. Data collection, interpretation, and means of communication will be explored.

Elementary Science Methods
This course is designed to introduce students to the teaching of basic science in grades K-5. It will include instruction and practice of scientific process skills in the basics of life and physical science. Integration between science disciplines will be emphasized. Students will explore methods of designing, implementing, and evaluating hands on, real life discovery experiences in science.

Elementary Social Science Methods
This course is designed to meet the standards of KSDE for teaching elementary school social science in grades K-6. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and modes of inquiry into the social science disciplines of geography, history, economics, and politics. Students will be presented with ways to design, plan, and implement developmentally appropriate lessons in the classroom. Course work will also address issues from global, regional, and cultural perspectives.

Emergent Literacy & Assessment
A study of the theories and principles that guide emergent literacy instruction. Focus is on the cognitive development of the young reader and how it relates to brain-based research. Emphasis is placed on the components of reading and effective strategies for planning and implementing reading instruction. Assessment tools and remediation techniques are examined and applied.

English Composition I, EN-CP-103-G-(3,4)-FA, SP
Instruction and practice in personal expository essays and paragraphs, with emphasis on correct writing. Students needing additional writing practice are expected to sign up for 4 hours. Required for graduation and prerequisite for E 104-G.

English Composition II, EN-CP-104-G-(3,4)-SP
Instruction in writing with emphasis on research and analytical exposition. Required for graduation. Prerequisite: E 103-G.

English Essentials, EN-CP-101-G-(2)-FA
A course for those needing additional help with English skills. (Students in need of additional academic help see Guidance Center on page 20.)

Environmental Science, NS-BI 100-G-(4)-SP
A course designed to introduce the student to the interrelationships between organisms and their environment with emphasis on how man affects these interactions. Environmental issues such as pollution, resource use, loss of biodiversity, etc. are discussed in light of economic, political, and cultural influences. This is a general education science course for non-majors, however it is useful for majors in environmental biology. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. (Offered alternate years.)

Ethics in Media, CO-CO-428-(3)-SP (3 year cycle)
Foundation and frameworks of media ethics. Application of basic concepts of ethics to media performance in news, advertising, and entertainment. Case studies in assessing media performance.

Evangelism & Spiritual Formation, PR-YM 250-(3)-FA
A study of the aspects of personal evangelism stressing the need to be witnessing now. Several methods will be explored and the student will be required to be totally familiar with and able to use at least one method. Furthermore, the course will help the student develop a personal lifestyle of spiritual formation including the use of spiritual disciplines and discover how to help implement spiritual formation in discipling a new believer.

Exceptional & Diverse Learners, ED-CC 300-(3)
Through this course, the teacher candidate will be able to identify the characteristics and diversity of special needs students. They are often referred to as those with exceptionalities. This would include language barriers, emotional issues, social and cognitive differences.

Exceptional Learner, ED-CC 250-(3)-FA
This course provides an overview of the developmental, behavioral, intellectual, and educational characteristics of individuals with disabilities at all age levels. This knowledge will assist the potential teacher to become a critical thinker and a more creative planner in appropriately integrating students with disabilities into the regular classroom which will then make him/her a more effective teacher.

Exegesis, PR-MN 415-(3-4)
In this class the student will be introduced to the technical language and the hermeneutical tools needed for doing exegetical work. The course will introduce the various methods by which Scripture has been approached and interpreted in the life of the Church-historical perspective. Students will be challenged to think carefully and critically about one’s own method(s). This course is intended to help the student in “rightly dividing the Word of truth” for teaching and preaching. (Offered on demand.)

Exercise Leadership, SP-SH 420-(3)-SP
This course will emphasize the necessary leadership qualities and skills expected for leading exercise activities. The student will develop professional competencies through classroom instruction as well as observational and practical experiences.
Prerequisite: PE 415 Exercise Testing, Evaluation, and Prescription.

Exercise Physiology, SP-SH 308-(3)-FA
A study of the effects of exercise on the major systems of the human body including the cardio-respiratory, neuromuscular, glandular and digestive. Other effects influencing human exercise will be examined including climate, altitude and ergogenic aids.
Prerequisite: B 101-G General Biology, B 204-G Human Anatomy & Physiology, and Junior standing.

Exercise Testing, Evaluation, and Prescription, SP-SH 415-(3)-FA
This course will consider the use of health and fitness field and laboratory instruments, techniques, procedures and equipment. Special emphasis will be placed on the ability to administer test protocols for evaluating the health-related components of physical fitness.
Prerequisites: PE 308 Exercise Physiology, PE 310 Kinesiology, and PE 320 Measurement& Evaluation in Health & Physical Education.

-F-

Family Life Studies, SS-PSY 454 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
Helps students develop biblical convictions on an array of family issues, primarily in the areas of parenting and respect for human life. Students will be exposed to typical parenting and sanctity of human life topics, threats and challenges facing the family and the biblical principles relating to these issues.

Family, Church and Society Studies, SS-POL 427 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
Facilitates careful and critical thinking about the Church as a transformed and transforming community– a radically redemptive, Kingdom-centered counter-culture through which God heals individuals, families and societies.

Federal Income Tax, BS-AC 316 (MC)-(3)-SP
This course focuses on the study of individual income tax theory, planning and application.
Prerequisites: BUS 220, BUS 221, EC 260, EC 261. BS-AC 325 (MC) Governmental and Not-for-Profit

Field Anthropology, SS-SO 328-(4)-WI
Designed for interterm, this course will provide students with an opportunity to explore anthropological principles and insights in both the classroom and the field. Included will be detailed observations of archaeological remains of Native American cultures in Southwestern U.S., and possibly participation in an archaeological dig and/or observation of a Native American culture in a naturalistic setting. The relationship between the natural environment and various components of culture (material, social, spiritual) will be explored. (Offered alternate years.)

Film Studies, CO-CO 220-G-(4)-WI (2 year cycle)
Film Studies will lead to a better understanding of the capabilities of film to incorporate many different disciplines (history, religion, culture, politics, etc.). The class will present the “gray areas” between fiction and reality; encouraging analytical and diverse responses in thought, writing and discussion from the students. (minimal fee required)

Financial Accounting, BS-AC 220-(3)-FA
The course covers the nature and purpose of accounting, basic accounting concepts and procedures, methods of processing, summarizing and classifying financial data. The accounting cycle, merchandising, measuring and reporting current assets and liabilities, and accounting for partnerships and corporations are also covered.
Prerequisite: BS-EC 261. (Offered on demand.)

Financial Institutions Management
, BS-MG 358-(3)-FA
Students are challenged to investigate the factors influencing bank reserves and the money supply while the Federal Reserve System and the Treasury attempt to control these same factors. Emphasis includes monetary theory and analysis of current policy issues. Several financial intermediaries will be explored.

First Aid, SP-SH 201-(2)-FA
Practical emergency treatment of the injured; practice in bandaging, splint application, artificial respiration, and other first aid measures. Student has the opportunity to gain Red Cross CPR/First Aid Certification.

Fitness and Wellness, SP-SH 100-G-(1)-FA, SP
The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the relationship of physical activity and fitness health so the student will select an appropriate personal lifestyle necessary to produce optional lifelong health and well-being.

Fitness Walking/Softball, SP-AC 144-G-(1)-SP

Free Methodist History (or Denominational History), PR-BI 130-(2)-SP
A study of the history, organization, mission, and doctrines of the Free Methodist Church (or other chosen denomination). It is one of the preliminary courses of study for membership in a Free Methodist conference. (Offered on demand.)

Freshman Seminar, ID-SM 103-(1)-FA
The purpose of this course is to equip the students with skills related to success in college. Topics covered will be: career interest, values, aptitudes, spiritual gifts, history of CCC, entry survey, liberal arts education, time management, volunteer service, study skills, money management, etc.

Foundations of Literacy
A study of the nature and process of reading, the research related to language acquisition, and instructional methods for developing reading skills and comprehension. Emphasis is placed on the progression of reading development, including an intense study of graphemes, morphemes, and phoneme awareness. Biological, genetic, cognitive, environmental, and instructional factors that interact to influence reading development will also be discussed.

-G-

General Biology, NS-BI 101-G-(4)-FA, SP
An introduction to the principles and concepts of the biological sciences. Coverage includes principles of cell biology, heredity, ecology, creation/evolution issues, and a survey of living things. This course is intended for non-science majors although it may also serve as a foundational course for biology majors.

General Chemistry, NS-CH 102-G-(4)-SP
A study of fundamental principles of chemistry and properties of matter. Emphasizes scientific method, relationship of chemistry to the other natural science, and consumer chemistry. Intended primarily for those who have not previously taken a chemistry course. There are no science or mathematics prerequisites.

General Epistles, PR-BI 308-G-(3)-FA
A study of letters written by James, Peter, John, Jude, and the book of Hebrews. (Offered alternate years.)

General Physical Chemistry

General Physics I, NS-PH 205-G-(4)-FA
A first course for pre-med, biology and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: NS-MA 104-G College Algebra. Lab is included.

General Physics II, NS-PH 206-(4)-SP
A continuation of NS-PH 205-G. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205-G. Lab is included.

General Psychology, SS-PY 110-G-(3)-FA, SP
A general introduction to psychology with special emphasis upon psychology as a basic science dealing with human behavior. The student is introduced to sensation, perception, learning, personality disorders, psychotherapy, and social psychology. Designed for both majors and non-majors.

Genesis, PR-BI 203-G-(2)-SP
This is an intensive study of the first book of the Bible emphasizing the narrative as normative for faith and teaching. Both the historical background and the theological principles (such as creation, the origin of human sin, salvation and sanctification) are considered and seen as foundational for the Christian’s worldview.

Genetics, NS-BI 310-(4)-SP
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and applications of classical, molecular, and population genetics. Laboratory experiences include work with transmission genetics, Drosophila studies, and techniques of DNA manipulation.
Prerequisites: NS-BI 202 (or higher) and NS-CH 111 or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years.)

Global Peace Studies (at McPherson College), MC-PS 215-(3)-SP
An analysis of the problem of international conflict. This course studies the economic, political, and ideological causes of international violence, and the mechanisms used to mediate and resolve modern conflicts. Requires permission of CCC's academic office. (Offered alternating years).

Gospel of John, PR-BI 207-G-(4)-WI
An analytical study of the fourth gospel with the key verse as a guide. Attention is given to the text, date written, and author of the book. (Offered alternate years.)

Gospel of Luke, PR-BI 206-G-(3-4)-WI
This course is designed to explore the Gospel of Luke and discover its unique features as a record of the life of Christ. An inductive approach will be used with student participation in a group. (Offered on demand.)

Gospel of Mark, PR-BI 205-G-(2)-FA
An inductive study of the second gospel in its first century setting. Special attention is given to the inductive method of study with its values for the student.

Group and Organizational Dynamics, EX-OR 415-(3)-T1
This course is a study of group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on decision-making and resolving conflict in groups. Adult learners develop strategies for efficient and productive group management and determine which tasks are handled by groups or individuals.

Guitar Techniques, MU-MS 319-G-(1)-SP
This course is designed to cover the elementary principles of playing and teaching the guitar and bass. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic guitar and bass techniques. Recommended for students pursing elementary and secondary music education. Students must own their own guitar.

-H-

Historiography/Senior Seminar, SS-HI-(3)
This course examines the role of historical writing and interpretation within a cultural context. The nature of history is explored and its effect on the development of society. As a senior capstone course, the student is required to participate in research and writing, with a final project submitted at the end of the semester.

History and Systems of Psychology

History of Christianity, EX-PR 332-(3)-T2
A survey of the Christian movement from new Testament roots to the modern day institution on Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant expressions. There will be a focus on key moments, critical issues, outstanding leaders, and how all these played a role in shaping what Christians believe and teach today.

History of Christianity, PR-HS 331-G-(3)-SP and SS-HI 331-G-(3)-SP
A survey of the history of the Christian movement from New Testament times to modern times, focusing on key movements, critical issues, outstanding leaders and important turning points.

History of Mathematics

History of the American West, SS-HI 345-(2)-SP
This study will concentrate on the development of civilization west of the Mississippi, beginning with the earliest inhabitant of the North American continent and through the period of colonization and eventual domination by Americans of European descent. Geographical, military, social, political, and environmental issues will be addressed. (Offered alternate years.)

History of World Civilization I & II, SS-HI 103/104-G-(3, 3)-FA, SP
A general survey of the root origins and the rise of orderly society, the development of culture as seen in art, literature, philosophy, and science. The development of social and political institutions is stressed. Courses may be taken independently of each other.

History of World War II, SS-HI 245-G-(1)-SP
A history of the events which led to this greatest of wars, a chronology of events in both the European and Pacific theaters, and how the war influenced subsequent events. An emphasis will be placed on the involvement and influence of the United States. Offered alternate years.)

Homiletics & Critique, EX-MN 411-(3)-T4
Through this course the student will be introduced to homiletical methodology and communication theory; including, how to structure various types of sermons (e.g. narrative, topical, exegetical, etc.), creative thinking, and presentational style. The student will be required to develop and present a series of completed sermon/oral presentations demonstrating proficiency in the use of the hermeneutical skills and tools. The goal is to craft messages that are both biblically sound and that communicate to the modern audience.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I, NS-BI 204-G-(5)-FA
A study of the structure and function of the major systems of the human body. This course is intended for biology majors, pre-med majors, physical education majors and other who need knowledge of the human body. Prerequisites: NS-BI 101-G or NS-BI 102-G. NS-CH 102-G or NS-CH 111-G is advisable. Four hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

Human Growth and Development, SS-PY 201-(3)-FA
A study of the physical, mental, social, and personality growth and development for the full life span of the human being.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology. (Offered alternate years.)

Human Resource Management, BS-MG 356-(3)-SP
Topics include staffing, performance appraisal, compensation, training and development, employee rights, and unionization. Contemporary issues include quality of work-life and legal environment. (Offered alternate years.)

Human Resource Management, EX-MG 445-(3)-T3
Adult learners explore the values and perceptions of selected groups affecting social and economic life through an analysis of policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development and compensation of employees. Special attention is given to Equal Opportunity and Office of Safety and Health Administration legislation through a series of case studies and simulations.

Human Sexuality

-I-

Individual and Dual Sport Analysis, SP-SH 307-(2)-FA
This course is designed to develop a knowledge and skill of individual and dual sports. Included will be technique on how to teach as well as coach these sports. Possible sports include badminton, bowling, golf, racquetball, and tennis. Other sports may be introduced as time and interest allow. (Offered alternate years.)

Individual or Team Sports, SP-AC 104-G

Inductive Methodology-Gospel of Mark, EX-BI 303-(3)-T1
While studying the New Testament Gospel of Mark the student will learn the important discipline and tool for ministry--the Inductive Method. This class will focus on the three stages of the inductive model observation, interpretation, and application. The student will also be challenged to apply this method to the task of ministry. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 159

Industrial/Organizational Psychology, SS-PY 335-(3)-FA
A survey of the applications of psychology in industry, the course topics include personnel selection, training, and performance appraisal; organizational psychology and job design; human engineering of the industrial workplace; and issues of employee motivation, morale, safety and health. An emphasis is placed on the application of psychological principles to the understanding of organizational effects on individual and group behavior.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology. (Offered alternate years.)

Instruction Media Technology, ED, CC 365-(2)-FA
This course is designed to acquaint prospective teachers with current technology and its application to K-12 education. In class and out of class methods will be explored. A sampling of topics will include, but not be limited to: presentation software, laptop/desktop computers, DVD, digital media, websites, pod and web casting, internet, Blackboard, research, on-line coursework, and virtual classrooms.

Instrument Flying I, AV-AF 202 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
This course brings the student with a Private Pilot Certificate half-way to completion of the instrument rating. It includes practice and maneuvers in simulated and actual instrument flight. An additional 40 hours above the Private Flying hours are required. Upon completion of this course, the student should have at least 80 total hours flying time.
Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate, completion or concurrent enrollment in AV 201.

Instrument Flying II, AV-AF 203 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
With this course the student is expected to complete the instrument rating. It includes practice and maneuvers in simulated and actual instrument flying. A minimum of 45 additional hours of flight time is required. At the completion of this course, the student should have at least 125 total hours of flying time and the instrument rating
Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate, completion or concurrent enrollment in AV 201.

Instrumental Conducting & Rehearsal Techniques, MU-MS 315-G-(2)-SP
A Continuation of MUS 310 (Basic Conducting) with an emphasis on further development of baton technique when directing an instrumental group. Emphasis will also be placed on rehearsal procedures and methods, interpretation, score reading, and analysis.
Prerequisite: MUS 310. (Offered every other year.)

Intermediate Accounting, BS-AC 320-(4)-FA
A study that includes accounting theory, financial statements, the concept of future and present value, temporary and long-term investments, inventory evaluation, and fixed and intangible assets.
Prerequisites: BS-AC 220, BS-AC 221.

Intermediate Accounting II, BS-AC 321-(4)-SP
A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I that will include a study of bonds, pensions, and leases; corporate accounting; capital and retained earnings; tax allocation; changes in accounting methods; working capital analysis; comparative statements; and ratio analysis.
Prerequisite: BS-AC 320.

Intermediate Algebra, NS-MA 103-(3)-FA
This course satisfies the prerequisite for College Algebra. It will also help prepare the student for Introduction to Mathematics. This course is offered for elective credit only and does not meet the Mathematics general education requirement for any degree offered at Central. Topics include real numbers, variable expressions, first degree equations and inequalities, geometry, linear equations and inequalities in two variables, systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, rational exponents and radicals, and quadratic equations.

Intermediate Photography, HU-AR 209-G-(2)-FA, SP
Practical application of black and white photography, including picture taking, operation of camera, composition, film developing and printing. Darkroom experience included.
Prerequisite: ART/C 109 or instructor’s permission.

Intermediate Photography, HU-AR 209-G-(2)-FA, SP
Practical application of black and white photography, including picture taking, operation of camera, composition, film developing and printing. Darkroom experience included.
Prerequisite: C/ART 109-G or instructor’s permission.

International Business, BS-MG 372-(3, 4)-WI
This course will introduce the student to international business and the economics and politics of international trade and investment, the functions and form of the global monetary system, the strategies and structures of international business, and how to cope with cultural differences as a manager. The course may include an opportunity to visit a foreign country to observe first hand international differences.
(Prerequisite: permission of instructor, offered on demand.)

International Relations (at McPherson College), MC-G-PS 125-(3)-WI
An introduction to the study of international relations focusing on current problems and contemporary theories. Topics include the problem of war and peace, the international economic system, and the global environment. This class may travel abroad. Requires permission of CCC's academic office (Offered alternating years.)

Internship, SP-SH 495
The student will be placed with a sport organization for a controlled learning experience with the student’s career specialization. Prerequisite: The student must follow the Sport Science Department procedures for application of internship. Sport Science & Health

Internship, PR-MN 396/496-(US)-(3-6)
A hands-on experience to enhance academic knowledge in one's major field or for exposure to a ministry or people group. A large selection of professional, cross-cultural, and service internships are available. Credit involves reports and final evaluations from the supervisor and four meetings with the internship coordinator. (Credit is based on 1 credit hour for each 40 hours of supervised internship.) Juniors/Seniors only, by application

Internship/Practicum, NS-BI 295/395/495-(3-4)-FA, WI, SP (See page 41.)
These individualized programs offer the sophomore- Senior student in good standing an opportunity for an introduction in the field experience of his/her interest. Some examples follow:dental hygiene, medical technology, nursing, physical therapy, veterinarian medicine,
medicine, physician’s assistant, and wildlife management.

Internship/Practicum, NS-CH 295/395/495-(3- 5)-FA, WI, SP
The opportunity to integrate classroom work and practical experience in an organized program that is designed to expose students to the world of work. All persons in the life science will be expected to have a least one cooperative education experience. (See page 49.)

Internship/Practicum, NS-MA 295/395/495-(3-5) FA, WI, SP
The opportunity to integrate classroom work and practical experience in an organized program that is designed to expose students to the world of work.

Internship/Practicum, SS-CJ/HI/PO/PY/SO 295/395/495-(1-4)-FA, WI, SP
Focus on the Family The following courses offered through Focus on the Family (FF) in Colorado Springs, Colorado

Internship, SP-SM 499-(3)-FA, SP
The student will be placed with a sport organization for a controlled learning experience with the student’s career specialization.
Prerequisite: The student must follow the Sport Science Department procedures for application of internship.

Interpersonal Communications, CO-CO 312-(3)-SP (2 year cycle)
This course is an oral communications course designed to acquaint students with the basic concept of human communication, as well as the more specialized skills needed in developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships. Self-concept, self-disclosure, perception and relationship development are the major units covered, along with special attention given to communication on the job, in the classroom and with one’s peers.

Intramural and Recreational Sports Administration, SP-SH 250-(3)
An introduction to the history and philosophy of intramural programs, as well as foundational information in recreation. (Offered on demand.)

Intro to Broadcasting, CO-CO 222-(3)-SP (3 year cycle)
The study of the technics and practice of radio & TV broadcasting to include discussion of legal and ethical responsibilities of the broadcaster. Discussion will focus around all aspects of radio & TV production. Areas for hands-on experience will be explored. (Offered alternate years.)

Intro to World Literature, EN-LT 217-G -(3)
This course is an overview of literature’s development throughout the world. It will cover all genres of literature and, of course, include works from different cultures allowing the study to focus on unique elements and characteristics of the cultures represented.

Introduction to Aviation, AV-AF 101 (MA)-(3)-FA
This course is intended for those interested in pilot training with no prior experience. It also includes sufficient background material and flying time for the student to pass the FAA written private pilot test. Passing the written test is a requirement before receiving credit.

Introduction to Biblical Studies, PR-BI 100-G-(2)-FA
The purpose of this course is to provide the student an opportunity to gain an awareness of the contents of the Bible, the societies in which it was produced and the contribution that it has made to history, culture and the personal spiritual lives of individuals.

Introduction to Christian Education, PR-EM 220-(3)-SP
This is a study of the principles and practices of the teaching and the educational ministry within the local church. Principles of church growth evaluated in relationship to the educational ministry.

Introduction to Christian Missions, PR-MS 252-(2)-FA
An introduction to the history, persons, and methods of Christian missions. The course will offer the student guidance in determining his or her call to be a full-time missionary. (Offered alternate years.)

Introduction to Computer Programming

Introduction to Criminal Justice, SS-CJ 235-(3)-FA
Introduction to the historical backgrounds, agencies and processes, purposes and function, ethics, administration, and technical problems of the criminal justice system. (Offered alternate years, FA, evenings)

Introduction to Education, ED-CC 210-(2)-WI
An active study of the history and process of education: The role of teachers and how schools are run. Designed for students who want to explore education-- what it is, where it has come from, where it is going-- to examine motives for becoming educators. Requires actual experience in a public school classroom.

Introduction to Information Processing, BS-CP 132-(3)-SP
The student is introduced to the various uses of computers in business and the influence of computers on society. The student also learns about the components of computer systems and computer applications- word processing, spreadsheets, database, and graphics.

Introduction to Instrument Flight, AV-AF 201 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
Includes concentration of study in navigation, meteorology, aircraft systems, and air traffic control. This course is completed when the student passes the FAA instrument written exam.
Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate

Introduction to Journalism CO-CO 115-(3)
This course is designed to introduce the skills of writing and reporting, within the context of developing feature articles for journalism and mass media. The goal of the course is to help the student develop a unique, yet clear and concise writing style. Special attention will be given to the interview process, ethical concerns, audience awareness, constructing articles, as well as other journalistic issues.

Introduction to Law & Legal Studies, SS-CJ 241-(4)-WI
Students will become knowledgeable on law within the legal system. They will be introduced into the field of law and its impact on society. They will be exposed to the historical precedents and to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a law office of their interest (according to availability) to observe and interact with professionals in the legal field as part of the course work. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to recognize which theories relate to law and current issues and which do not. This course is offered Interterm, and there is normally an additional fee.
Prerequisites: approval from the instructor, Mr. Ron Hagan, and be in good standing with the college. (Offered alternate years.)

Introduction to Literature, EN-LT 215-G-(2)-SP (3 year cycle)
An introduction to three major genres of literature, short story, poetry, and drama, through reading, viewing, discussing, and analyzing works from these genres.  Study will focus on the unique elements and characteristics of each genre as illustrated through individual works.

Introduction to Mass Media, CO-CO 221-G-(3)-WI (2 year cycle)
A study of the history, controls, problems and societal importance of the information and entertainment media. Required for communications and journalism.

Introduction to Music Technology, MU-MS 179-G-(2)-SP
A course designed to survey concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with the modern electronic music studio. This course will introduce the student to the different types and uses of microphones, mixing consoles, effects processors, and most aspects of midi-technology. This course will demonstrate current uses of these tools in a multi-track studio.

Introduction to Philosophy, PR-PH 261-G-(3)-FA, SP
A survey of the fundamental problems of philosophy and their classification. Attention is given to modern philosophers and their systems of thought. Emphasis will also be on Christian philosophy and ethics.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Introduction to Physical Education/Sport and Fitness, SP-SH 202-(3)-FA
Includes an historical and contemporary view of physical education career possibilities; aims and objectives, with a view toward the development of a basic philosophy of physical education.

Introduction to Shakespeare, EN-CP 424-G-(3)-DS
A critical study of representative historical plays, tragedies, and comedies with emphasis on the unique characteristics of Shakespeare’s style. Includes analysis of individual plays and a research project.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Introduction to Sports Management, SP-SM 200-(3)-FA
Includes the basic concepts of sport management, career preparation and professional opportunities. This course is a primer to the different areas that sports management practitioners must understand and master to be efficient in their careers.

Introduction to Team Sports, SP-SH 208-(2)-SP
The study, practice, and organization of sports such as soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball, softball, etc.

Introduction to the New Testament, PR-BI 102-G-(3)-SP
The student explores the background, history, and the basic teaching of each book. An emphasis will be made on the internal and external evidence related to authorship.

Introduction to the Old Testament, PR-BI 101-G-(3)-FA
The Old Testament text is surveyed according to its parts: Law, Prophets, and Writings. In addition, background materials and the critical method are explored. The Old Testament will be viewed through its literary and historical settings.

Introduction to Theatre, CO-TH 112-G-(3)-FA, SP
This course increases awareness and appreciation of the arts involved in theatrical entertainments. The student will be exposed to a wide variety of productions, both live and recorded, which will help in becoming familiar with the various styles, genres, and traditions to be found in both historical and contemporary dramatic practice. The student will also be introduced to the functions of the different artists and craftspeople involved in dramatic productions. Required for Drama emphasis. (Offered alternate years.)

Introduction to Theology I & II, PR-TH 360/361-(3)-FA, SP
The study of basic concepts in Christian doctrine. This two-semester course will place primary emphasis on introducing the student to the essential doctrines in a systematic form, placing strong stress on the Biblical record as normative for faith and belief.

Introduction to World Literature

Invertebrate Zoology, NS-BI 201 G-(4)-FA
A study of the chemical and physical organization of cells, development, genetics, and a survey of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative anatomy, morphology, and physiology. Also included is a study of evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101- G or permission from the instructor (Offered alternate years)

Investments, BS-MG 342-(3, 4)-WI
Basic concepts of investing, including market mechanics, investment vehicles, terminology, fundamental and technical analysis of stocks serve as the focus of this course. A trip to visit the financial district in New York and/or Washington D.C. may be included.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor, offered alternate years.

Issues and Trends in Sports, SP-SM 406-(3)-FA
This course will explore the latest philosophical issues and controversies, which are impacting the area of sport. The student will explore the current and future trends of sport and how it may impact the society.

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Jazz Band, MU-EN 146,346-G-(1)-SP
Open to all instrumentalists who played in high school jazz band, or is at the intermediate level of proficiency on his/her instrument. The jazz band focuses on all forms of jazz/swing of the 20th century, and concentrates on improvisatory and solo work. Improvisation is a key ingredient of the jazz band sound, requiring good listening and performance skills.

Junior Project, CO-CO 390-(2)-DS
Assigned project in the appropriate area of communication, developed jointly with the professor and student, independently accomplished by the student with supervision by the professor.

Junior Recital/ Project, MU-JR 321-(0)
Students will prepare a minimum of 30 minutes of music with his/her applied music professor to be performed at a public recital, or submit an approved project by his/her music advisor.

Junior Teaching Practicum – Elementary
This class is offered in the January term. Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program is a prerequisite. Class times will be divided between instruction on campus and hands-on training in local K-12 schools. Course content will include classroom management and organization, instructional strategies, and lesson preparation. Students will integrate theory and concepts with practical application.

Junior Teaching Practicum – Secondary
This class is offered in the January term and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program is a prerequisite. Class times will be divided between instruction on campus and hands-on training in local K-12 schools. Course content will include classroom management and organization, instructional strategies, and lesson preparation. Students will integrate theory and concepts with practical application.

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Kansas History, SS-HI 334-(2)
A survey of Kansas history from prehistoric to modern times. Focus is on social, economic, military and political history. Required for candidates for teacher licensure.

Kinesiology, SP-SH 310-(3)-SP
A study of human motion emphasizing the musculoskeletal structure and neuromuscular involvement in voluntary movement. In addition, biomechanical principles involved in the performance of motor/sport skills and strength training exercises.
Prerequisite: B 101-G General Biology, B 204-G Human Anatomy & Physiology, and Junior standing.

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Lab Band (CCM), MU-EN 177,377-G-(I)-FA, SP
The Lab Band class provides an opportunity to learn performance skills in a standard contemporary Christian band setting. The bands perform praise and worship songs, “cover” songs from popular musicians and original compositions. The band rehearses four hours weekly. By audition only.

Late 20th Century History, SS-HI 332
This course is a survey of American history from 1945 to the present. Specific attention will be given to a comparison of the affects of World War II, Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Iraq. An investigation into Cold War politics, civil rights struggles, Reaganomics, as well as other topics will be conducted. Discussions on contemporary society and news are a major aspect of this course.

Leadership/Followership Development SS-PY 211-(2)
The course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of leadership and followership. The course will investigate the essential elements of both concepts and challenge the student to master the concepts relative to both.  Specific attention will be placed on Leadership Styles, Followership Styles, Personality Styles, Spiritual Gifts, and the Leader/Follower Relationship.

Learning Skills & Hermeneutics, EX-MN 300-(3)-T1
This class will serve as an introduction for the adult learner to help them get reacquainted with the disciplines needed to be successful as they return to college. These will include: adult development, teamwork principles, receiving and giving critical analysis, “life-mapping”, small group communication, study methods, writing, critical thinking, and the important ministry skill of hermeneutics.

Level I Spanish, HU-FL 108-G-(4)-FA
Acquisition of the four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Also integrated into the course are cultural and geographical material related to Spanish- speaking countries. Besides the class periods, one hour of computer time is required each week. The course is conducted entirely in the target language.

Level II Spanish, HU-FL 109-G-(4)-SP
A continuation of Level I Spanish with emphasis on the mastery of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Besides class periods, one hour of computer time is required each week. The course is conducted entirely in the target language.
Prerequisite: FL 108-G or 3 years of high school Spanish.

Level III Spanish, HU-FL 208-G (MC)-(4)-FA
A review of grammatical principles followed by readings and vocabulary expansion. Classes conducted in Spanish. Oral preparation necessary for discussion of topics, short stories, and cultural research. Tutorial sessions required.

Linguistics I, EN-LT 220-G-(2)
This course will introduce students to the facts and phenomena of the English language. Students will learn about its structure and its history. The course is about the human mind and how our minds acquire language, use language, and pass it on to later generations.
Prerequisite: EN-CP 103-G and En-CP 104-G.

Linguistics II, EN-LT 320-G-(2)
This course will look at the English language within the society and will aim to enhance language awareness; it will also enable students to understand and assess current scientific debates in the field.
Prerequisite: EN-LG 220-G.

Literature and the Bible, EN-LT 306-G-(3)-SP
An introduction to literature which reflects Biblical influences in forms, ideas, and themes-particularly those themes which contribute to the spiritual, intellectual, and aesthetic growth of the individual.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or the instructor’s permission.

Literature of the American West, EN-LT 350-G-(3)-SP (3 year cycle)
A study of different genres of literature about the West and of writers from the western states. The course will include critical reading and analytical writing.

Luke

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Macroeconomics, BS-EC 261-G-(3)-SP
This course is an introduction to macroeconomic theory including a study of national income, spending, the creation of money, monetary and fiscal policy, and the problems of controlling inflation and unemployment.

Magazine Production I, II, III, CO-YB 218/318/418-(3, 2, 1)-SP
Focus on the more creative aspects of journalism,
especially those used for producing magazines. Experience gained through producing the Centralian and the Tiger’s Eye. 154 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Prerequisite: C- 115 or instructor’s permission.

Management and Administration, EX-BS 353-(3)-T3
This class will focus on providing basic skills related to management and administration of church and para-church organizations. Skills such as preparing budgets, simple accounting, personnel management, time management, letter writing, insurance, chairing meetings, legal matters, and others will be included.

Management of Not-For-Profits, BS-MG 354-(4)-WI
An introduction to management in the not-for-profit setting; includes preparation and maintenance of budgets, simple accounting procedures, internal controls to prevent theft and mismanagement, fund raising, personnel management (hiring, firing, record keeping, working with staff and volunteers), time management, effective letter writing, risk management and insurance, and legal contracts. Designed for individuals involved in full time or volunteer roles in not-for- profits organizations (e.g. churches, church boards, civic, community, or service organizations). (Offered alternate years.)

Management of Not-For-Profits, PR-MN/BS-MG 354-(4)-WI
An introduction to management in the not-for-profit setting; includes preparation and maintenance of budgets, simple accounting procedures, internal controls to prevent theft and mismanagement, fundraising, personnel management (hiring, firing, record keeping, working with staff and volunteers), time management, effective letter writing, risk management
and insurance, and legal contracts. Designed for those involved full time or in a volunteer role in not-for- profits, such as churches, church boards, civic, community, or service organizations. (Offered alternate years.)

Managerial Accounting, BS-AC 221-(3)-SP
This is an intermediate level course with emphasis on how accounting information can be interpreted and used as a tool of management in planning and controlling business activities of the firm. Major topics include manufacturing accounting, product costing, budget and control procedures, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisite: BUS 220 with a grade of C or better.

Managerial Marketing, EX-MG 360-(3)-T3
Principles of marketing that need to be understood by managers in all areas in order to develop and utilize effective marketing practices are examined. Concepts of our global economy, including major social, psychological, and political influences, will be explored and their marketing implications considered from a manager’s perspective.

Marimba Ensemble, MU-EN 147,347-G-(1)-SP
This is a multiple marimba approach to performance consisting of four to six individuals playing on two marimbas. The repertoire includes classical, popular and hymn arrangements. There are opportunities for performance both on and off campus.

Marriage and Family, SS-SO 381-G-(3-4)-FA, WI,SP
Areas considered include the background of marriage and the family, marriage preparation and partner selection, marital adjustments, and family living. Sociological, spiritual and practical perspectives are all addressed.

Marriage Studies, SS-PSY 453 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
Nurtures students to become leaders who are passionate, persuasive and respectful of those who are impacted by them. It equips them with personal strategies for promoting healthy families–beginning with their own relationships. Biblical guidance is reviewed, with the goal of aiding each student in their development of a personal strategy for dealing with marriage and leadership issues.

Measurement & Evaluation in Health & Physical Education, SP-SH 320-(3)-SP
This course will consider the basic principles related to measurement and evaluation including the selection, administration and use of tests unique to the field of health and physical education. Special emphasis will be placed on testing procedures.

Microbiology, NS-BI 304-G-(4)-SP
This course covers behavior and activity of microorganisms more or less common in the natural environment. Attention is given to bacteria in milk, water, and sewage. Technics of staining, culturing, and isolating microorganisms are covered.
Prerequisite: NSCH 111-G or NS-CH 102-G. (Offered alternate years.)

Microeconomics, BS-EC 260-G-(3)-FA
The course is as an introduction to microeconomic theory including an analysis of price theory, the marginal concept, and market structure and performance.

Modern Advanced Algebra

Modern Geometry

Motor Learning, SP-SH 426-(3)-FA
This course is designed to give a solid understanding of the development of motor skills and the principles and theories that govern that development. Applied analysis of motor learning and motor development principles and theories throughout the human life span (focus on PreK-12).

Multi-Engine, AV-AF 403 (MA) -(1)-FA, SP
The student receives instruction in aircraft systems and the piloting skills required to operate a multiengine aircraft safely.

Multi-Media in Worship, PR-MN 390-(3)
The goal is to introduce the student to different ways of incorporate technology and multi-media in worship. By using hands-on experience, the student will engage in programs, interviews, and software that will make this part of worship smooth in real life contexts. This course is also designed to not only enable the student to better utilize media in worship, but also to equip them with a heart and mind that can engage the deeper issues behind the frenzy of media in worship.

Multivariable Mathematics, NS-MA 212 (MC) -(4)-SP
A continuation of MA 112. Topics include infinite series, three-dimensional geometry, functions of variables.
Prerequisite: MA 112-G with a grade of C or better.

Music Appreciation, MU-MS 105-G-(2)-FA
This course is designed to help students develop better music listening skills. No previous instruction in music is required. A study of the elements of music, music history eras, composers and their styles, and instruments of the orchestra and band. This course is intended for both music minors and non-music majors.

Music History I: Ancient to Renaissance, MU-MS 362-G (MC)-(3)-three semester rotation
A study of the history of Western music from Biblical roots through the Renaissance(1600AD). A study of the people and their music in the medieval & renaissance eras. Significant musical figures, social customs, musical issues, style traits, and the early Christian church will be studied for their impact on the development of music in the Western European tradition.
Prerequisites: MUS 103-G and MUS 104-G or concurrent enrollment in MUS 103-G and MUS 104-G.

Music History II: Baroque to Classical, MU-MS 363-G (MC)-(3)-three semester rotation
This is a continuation of MUS 362, and is a study of the history of Western music during the Baroque and Classical periods of music (1600-1825 AD). Included will be a study of the leading musical composers, their contribution to musical repertoire, genres, form, and the overall development of music during the 17th and 18th centuries.
Prerequisites: MUS 362, MUS 203 (or concurrent enrollment).

Music History III: Romantic to Modern Day, MU-MS 364-G (MC)-(3)-three semester rotation
This is a continuation of MUS 363, and is a study of the history of Western music from the Romantic Era of music to modern day (1825 AD to present). Included will be a study of the leading musical composers, their contribution to musical repertoire, genres, form, and the overall development of music during the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisites: MUS 362, MUS 203 (or concurrent enrollment).

Music Methods for Elementary, MU-MS 380-G-(3)-FA-(MAC)

Music Methods for Secondary, MU-MS 385-G-(3)-SP-(MAC)

Music Ministry Team, MU-EN 182,382-G -(1)-FA, SP
The ministry team program is one of the most outstanding opportunities available during the college years. A ministry team provides students and opportunity to develop their ministry abilities, performance skills, musical skills, dramatic skills, and public presence. Each team performs usually two times a month. Current ministry teams ar: Lamps of Fire vocal ensemble (music), Chasing Eleanor (CCM band- Note: one new CCM ministry team each year), and Morning Star Revue (drama). By audition only.

Music Theatre Chorus, MU-MP 192,392-G-(1)-WI
Offers students an opportunity to be involved in the production of the musical operetta as a member of the larger cast. Rehearsals are held in the afternoon during Interterm.

Music Theory I, MU-MS 103-G-(3)-FA
This course will equip students with knowledge skills of basic materials in Western music theory including the notation of pitch, time classification, note and rest values, time signatures, intervals, the basic scales: major, minor, and modes, key signatures, figured bass, cadences, and triads. Class activities and outside assignments will provide a framework for students to acquire an understanding of the choral and metered structure of music.

Music Theory II, MU-MS 106-G-(3)-SP
A continuation of MUS 103-G. The student will gain knowledge of triads in root, first, and second inversions, counterpoint, voice leading, seventh chords, nonharmonic tones, harmonic progressions, secondary dominants, and the technique of harmonization.
Prerequisite: MUS 103-G.

Music Theory II, MU-MS 203-G-(4)-FA
A study of altered chords: the continued study of secondary dominants, diminished sevenths, augmented sixths, borrowed chords, chords of the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth. Attention is given to advanced modulation. Critical analysis of pieces and creative composition incorporating the above concepts is required.
Prerequisite: MUS 103–G & MUS 106–G.

Music Theory II, MU-MS 206-G-(4)-SP
A study of 20th and 21st Century composition techniques including altered chords, advanced modulation, atonal music, matrices, and various contemporary song forms. As music is a creative and changing art form creative composition incorporating the above concepts is required and encouraged of students.
Prerequisite: MUS 103–G, MUS 106–G, MUS 203-G.

Musical Theatre Production I, II, III, IV, CO-TH 191/291/391/491-G-(4)-WI
This course is centered around the production of a Broadway musical/operetta. Students will learn first hand all of the necessary theatre skills: singing, acting, character development, staging, choreography, set construction, painting, costume construction, makeup, lighting, and public relations. Required for Drama emphasis.

Musical Theatre Production I, II, III, IV, CO-TH/MU-MP 191,391-G-(4)-WI
This course is centered around the production of a Broadway musical/operetta. Students will learn first hand all of the necessary theatre skills: singing, acting, character development, staging, choreography, set construction, painting, costume construction, makeup, lighting, and public relations. Required for Drama emphasis.

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Natural Science, NS-SM 241-(1)-SP
This course consists of critical thinking skills and readings in science

Natural Science/Mathematics Seminar

New Testament Literature, EX-BI 302-(3)-T1
A close examination of the various styles of literature found in the New Testament Gospels, History, Epistles, and Apocalyptic. The class will also include discussion of the development of the Canon, authorship, and dating issues that are a part of the current debate surrounding the New Testament.

New Testament Theology of Evangelism, EX-TH 406-(3)-T4
Through examination of the New Testament documents, with a special emphasis on the Gospels, the book of Acts, and the preaching of the Apostles, this course is designed to challenge the student to understand the theological basis for the biblical practice of evangelism. Discussion will also include methodology that may assist the local church and the laity to engage in doing evangelism.

New Testament Theology of Evangelism, PR-TH 463-(4)-SP
A study designed for understanding the New Testament theological basis for the theory and practice of evangelism. The student is guided to discover the dynamic of God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in evangelism and discipling.

Newspaper Production I, II, III, CO-CO 116/216/316-(3, 2, 1)-SP
Study and practice of the elements necessary to produce a newspaper. Experience gained through production of the Tiger Chronicle and field trips. Prerequisite: C 115 or instructor’s permission.

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Officiating, SP-SH 270-(2)-WI
Includes football, baseball, basketball, and volleyball. Instruction and participation in individual or team sports.

Old Testament Literature, EX-BI 301-(3)-T1
This course is designed to provide the student with a detailed look at the literature of the Old Testament. This will include the study of the Torah, the history narratives, the writings of the prophets, and the collection known as Wisdom Literature.

Old Testament Prophets, PR-BI 305-G-(4)-WI
A study of the five major prophet books and the twelve minor prophet books. Each book is studied as to its background and content. (Offered alternate years.)

Oral Interpretation, CO-CO 114-G-(2)-FA (2 year cycle)
This course incorporates critical reading, written analysis and performance of literary texts (poetry, prose and drama). Emphasis is placed on the ability to interpret the meaning of manuscripts and convey that meaning to the target audience.

Orchestration, MU-MS 409-G-(2)-SP
The study and application of scoring techniques for small and large ensembles with particular attention to tone colors and combinations of instruments.
Prerequisite: MUS 204 or consent of instructor.

Organic Chemistry I, NS-CH 212-(4)-FA
The first course in a two semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used.
Prerequisites: NSCH 111 and NS-CH 112. (Offered Alternate years)

Organic Chemistry II, NS-CH 312-(4)-SP
The second course in a two semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and Organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used.
Prerequisites: NSCH 212 (Offered alternate years)

Organizational Behavior and Leadership, EX-BS 356-(3)-T3
Examines the psychological and sociological variables important in understanding individual motivation, group functioning, change, creativity, conflict, and leadership within the organization.

Organizational Behavior and Leadership, PR-MN/BS-MG/SS-PY 355-(3)-SP
This course examines the psychological and sociological variables important in understanding individual motivation, group functioning, change, creativity, organizational design, conflict and leadership in organizations. Particular attention is given to the application of leadership and management principles within the organizational structure. The course focuses on four distinct interrelated topics; the individual, the group, the organizational system, and the organizational dynamics. A series of self-assessments will help students determine their own organizational fit, as well as provide information concerning personal strengths and weaknesses related to managing an organization.

Organizational Behavior, SS-PY 355-(3)-SP
This course examines the psychological and sociological variables important in understanding individual motivation, group functioning, change, creativity, organizational design, conflict and leadership in organizations. Particular attention is given to the application of leadership and management principles within the organizational structure. The course focuses on four distinct interrelated topics; the individual, the group, the organizational system, and the organizational dynamics. A series of self-assessments will help students determine their own organizational
fit, as well as provide information concerning personal strengths and weaknesses related to managing an organization.

Ornithology, NS-BI 308-G-(4)-FA, SP
This course is designed to introduce students to the laboratory and field study of birds of the Great Plains. Course topics will include identification, family characteristics, distribution, ecological requirements and behavior. Course activities will include: lectures, videos, projects, library research, laboratory work and field trips. Field trips will be taken to Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Cheyenne Bottoms and several museums and zoos. The course is designed for any student interested in outdoor education, elementary and secondary education, conservation,
wildlife biology, national park and nature center work. It is an upper-division science course but is open to all majors.
Prerequisite NS-BI 101 and 202 (or higher) and permission of instructor. (Offered on demand.)

Outdoor Recreation Education, SP-SH 309-(3)-FA
A foundational course detailing numerous outdoor activities, their effects and benefits for our society.

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Pastoral Care
This course includes elements of theory and praxis related to pastoral ministry. It deals with issues such as one’s call and gifting, administrative tasks, visitation, understanding the sacraments and their use in worship, death and funerals. Through discussion of the text and collateral readings the student is challenged to engage in both the rationale and practice of this vital area of ministry.

Painting I, HU-AR 205-G-(2)-FA, SP
This is an introductory course in painting oils, water colors and acrylics with studies in color and composition. Still life, landscape, portraits and wildlife subjects are the basis of assigned student projects.
Prerequisite: ART 103 or instructor’s permission.

Painting II, HU-AR 206-G-(2)-FA, SP
This is an advanced painting class. It includes individualized student projects in oils, acrylics, and watercolor.
Prerequisite: ART 205 or instructor’s permission.

Pastoral Care, EX-MN 340-(3)-T2
This class will concentrate on the task of ministry as it relates to the pastoral role. consideration will be given to both biblical and historical understandings of the task of a paster while at the same time examining how a person can and should fulfill this vital ministry of the Church. This course will focus on skill development and an understanding of gifts for ministry.

Pastoral Care, PR-MN 341-(2)-FA
This course includes elements of theory and praxis related to pastoral ministry. It deals with issues such as one’s call and gifting, administrative tasks, visitation, understanding the sacraments and their use in worship, death and funerals. Through discussion of the text and collateral readings the student is challenged to engage in both the rationale and practice of
this vital area of ministry.

Pastoral Counseling, EX-PR 352-(3)-T2
This course examines the pastoral role in relationship to the ministry of the whole person, mind, body, and soul. Students will be introduced to the integration of psychology and theology. Specific attention will be given to developmental issues, marriage and family, interpersonal relationships, etc. as well as examine different approaches and skills involved with the counseling aspect of ministry.

Pauline Epistles, PR-BI 307-G-(2)
A study of the thirteen letters written by the apostle Paul. (Offered alternate years.)

Percussion Techniques, MU-MS 318-G-(1)-FA
This course is designed to cover the elementary principles of playing and teaching percussion instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic percussion techniques. Recommended for students pursuing elementary and secondary music education. (Offered every other year.)

Personal and Community Health, SP-SH 180-(2)-SP
This course is teaches healthy and intelligent living and the application of the fundamental principles of health. Various topics covered include fitness, nutrition, concepts of aging, infectious diseases, drug and tobacco use and consumer health.

Personal Finance, BS-MG 360-(3)-SP
Personal and family financial planning serves as the focus of this course. Emphasis is placed on time value of money, budgeting, investments, retirement planning, housing, car buying, and insurance.
Prerequisite: at least Junior standing.

Personal Values and Organizational Ethics, EX-OR 455-(3)-T4
Several major ethical theories are reviewed. Adult learners are asked to examine personal values through readings and workplace analysis to formulate a management philosophy incorporating business ethics, government accountability, human rights, and a responsible lifestyle in the contemporary world.

Personality Psychology, SS-PY 312-(3)-FA
An introduction to the theoretical approaches designed to explain the development of personality. While the purpose of the course is to engage contemporary theories and application of personality psychology, historical theories will also be explored.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology. (Offered alternate years.)

Persuasion/Argumentation, CO-CO 412-(3)-SP
This course will concentrate on the advanced learning of the mechanics and developing ideas of the speaker. Emphasis will be on the development and delivery of persuasive and argumentative speeches.
Prerequisite: C/PR 211. (Offered on a 3-year cycle.)

Philosophy of Education, ED-CC 400
This course covers the historical background of education in the United States. Inherent within this study is the role of nonpublic and public education and their respective philosophical tenets. Nonpublic would include Christian education, private college preparatory institutions, and home schooling. Notable contributions from across the spectrum will be studied and discussed, as the student seeks to develop his own personal philosophy of education.

Philosophy of Music and Worship, MU-MS 476-G-(2)-FA
This is a course in which students are challenged to develop a comprehensive philosophy regarding church music performance, music ministry, and worship. The course includes an in-depth study of the following questions: What is worship? How is worship accomplished in these different communities and cultures? And, how does one lead in one of these worship settings? The class will be made up of readings, attending different church worship settings, and writing papers to develop their philosophy of music and worship.

Photography Practicum, HU-AR 295/395/495-(1-3)- FA, SP
The integration of classroom work and practical experience in an organized program, designed to expose students to the world of work in areas of their emphasis while earning college credit on the job. Required for students with an emphasis in journalism.
Prerequisite: sophomore, junior or senior standing. (See page 49.)

Physical Education Methods, ED-PE 350 6-12-(3)-SP
Study of effective teaching with emphasis on teaching methods, student learning time, classroom management, and program planning. This course includes a ten hour practicum placement in a secondary education classroom. The purpose of this course is to analyze the teaching methods utilized in effective instructions and to help students understand the essential elements of teaching physical education at the secondary level. It is a hands-on, practical means of introducing the students to activities and procedures related to secondary physical education.

Physical Education Methods, ED-PE 351 PreK-6-(3)-SP
Study of effective teaching with emphasis on teaching methods, student learning time, classroom management, and program planning. This course includes a ten hour practicum placement in a secondary education classroom. The purpose of this course is to analyze the teaching methods utilized in effective instructions and to help students understand the essential elements of teaching physical education at the secondary level. It is a hands-on, practical means of introducing the students to activities and procedures related to secondary physical education.

Physiological Psychology, SS-PY 403-(3)-FA
This course provides a survey of biopsychology and the neurological basis for behavior, including a rudimentary overview concerning the physiology, anatomy and chemistry of the brain and central nervous system. (Offered alternate years.)

Piano Ensemble I,II,III,IV, MU-EN 149,349-G-(1)-FA, SP
Piano Ensemble is a multiple piano approach to performance— two, four, or more pianos played simultaneously. Repertoire includes selections from the classical through the contemporary periods. There are opportunities for performance both at the College and for off-campus functions.

Piano for Church Musicians, MU-MS 135-G-(1)-SP
A course designed to teach elements of good hymn playing including improvisational technics suitable for congregational singing and solo work (offertories, preludes, etc.) Transposition, harmonization, and modulation basics are included.
Prerequisite: MUS 125-G and instructor’s permission.

Piano History and Literature, MU-MS 311-G-(2)
This course traces development of composition through the five main periods of piano literature— Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century. Emphasis will be on knowing the major composers and on listening and recognizing the musical characteristics of ach style period

Piano Pedagogy, MU-MS 408-G-(2)-FA
A study of materials and teaching methods for the piano. The student interviews and observes at least two private teachers as well as analyzes various methods. (Offered on a directed study basis, see page 48.)

Piano Proficiency I, MU-MP 130
The first in a series of proficiency assessments designed to test the student’s ability on the piano in relation to technique, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and improvisation. 

Piano Proficiency II, MU-MP 140
The second in a series of required courses designed to test levels of piano proficiency and performance. Students must pass this course in order to matriculate through the music department.

Piano Proficiency III, MU-MP 230
The third in a series of required courses designed to test levels of piano proficiency and performance. Students must pass this course in order to matriculate through the music department.

Piano Proficiency IV, MU-MP 240
The final in a series of required courses designed to test levels of piano proficiency and performance. Students must pass this course in order to matriculate through the music department.

Piano Practicum, MU-MS 295,395-G-(2)-SP
The course is designed to allow the student to practice the skills gained in Piano Pedagogy under the supervision of an experience teacher. The student gives a thirty-minute lesson to a minimum of two and a maximum of four students per week. The students to be taught are selected by the college music staff and vary in ability and age level.

Plant Biology, NS-BI 203-G-(4)-SP
An introductory lab science course which includes a survey of the major plant groups with emphasis on taxonomy and basic concepts of botany. This is a general education course designed to provide a foundation in plant biology for those interested in further study in the sciences. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

Play Readings, CO-TH 490-H-(3)- DS
This course will concentrate on the student reading plays from all periods of history and the compilation of a notebook of vital information concerning the plays. This informational notebook will be of value for the serious dramatist as he/she enters a career in theatre.

Poetry, EN-LT 308-G-(3)-SP (3 year cycle)
An in-depth study of the different types of poetry and the characteristics of each. The course will include analysis and interpretation of a wide variety of poems. (Offered on a 2-year cycle.)

Political Science & Thought, SS-PO 333
Designed as an introductory course to political theory, this course will expose the student to political philosophy and its influence on how societies interpret the role of humanity and its governing bodies.

Popular Music in America

Practical Theology of Worship, MU-MS 409-(3)-T4
This course has a two-fold emphasis: 1) how one crafts and delivers a sermon to a congregation; 2) the elements that go into developing and leading worship. The student will be given hermeneutical tools for the development of sermons and opportunity to preach as part of the class. There will also be discussion of the tools (technological, arts, and others) currently available and the creativity needed for those who lead worship.

Practicum, PR-MN 295/395/495-(2-4)
The purpose of the practicum is to provide students specialized experiences and opportunities, tailored to one’s academic discipline, skills and personal interests. A total of 120 hours completes the practicum. In addition to time spent at their designated site, students are expected to maintain an ongoing journal and produce a typed 2-3 page summary of their experience. We offer practicums in many areas, some of which are listed: Child Evangelism, Children’s Ministry, Christian Education, Evangelism, Ministry, Missions, Music Ministry, Urban Ministry,Worship Arts, Youth Ministry. There are practicums/internships possible in local churches, para-church ministries, home and foreign missions settings and other specialized situations. These practicums/internships are coordinated between the student, a Religion faculty member, the college and the specific institution/setting selected.

Practicum, PR-MN 450/490 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
The purpose of the practicum is to provide students specialized experiences and opportunities, tailored to one’s academic discipline, skills and personal interests. A total of 120 hours completes the practicum. In addition to time spent at their designated site, students are expected to maintain an ongoing journal and produce a typed 2-3 page summary of their experience.

Practicum, SS-PSY- 450/490 (FF)-(3)-FA, SP
The purpose of the practicum is to provide students specialized experiences and opportunities, tailored to one's academic area, skills, and personal interests. A total of 120 hours completes the practicum. In addition to time spent at their designated site, students are expected to maintain an ongoing journal and produce a typed 2-3 page summary of their experience. Juniors/Seniors only, by application.

Practicum in Missions, PR-MS 251-(4)-WI
Students will travel to a mission and assist in some of the work of a missionary. This also gives the student experience in another culture.

Praise Band Application, MU-MS 405-G-(1)
Involvement with the chapel praise and worship team as a singer or instrumentalist in leading of praise and worship for campus chapels.
Prerequisite: Audition.

PreK-6 Physical Education Methods, ED-EE 351-(2)
Study of effective teaching with emphasis on teaching methods, student learning time, classroom management, and program planning. This course includes a ten hour practicum placement in an elementary physical education classroom.

Preaching and Worship Leadership, PR-MN 410-(3)-SP
The importance of leadership and evaluation are investigated as primary in worship. Preaching and worship theory will be combined with practice.

Principles of Auditing, BS-AC 437 (MC)-(3)-FA
Course will emphasize audit techniques and audit procedures, Using a text and coordinated audit practice set to accomplish class objectives.
Prerequisites: BUS 321, BUS 322.

Principles of Business, BS-MG 100-(3)-FA
This course is a survey of the field of business for the non-business major or the beginning business student. Topics include the business environment, starting and growing a business, management, human resource management, marketing, finance and international business.

Principles of Finance, BS-MG 353-(3)-SP
This course focuses on the study of decision-making techniques involving working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing, dividend policy, and mergers with emphasis on time-value of money.
Prerequisites: BS-AC 220, BS-EC 261.

Principles of Management and Supervision, EX-MG 330-(3)-T2
Adult learners examine motivational theory and its application to individual and group functioning in work and home situations. Leadership styles related to particular circumstances are analyzed. Negotiation is covered through readings and class practice, with analysis of the effect on productivity.

Principles of Management, BS-MG 351-(3)-FA
Types of managerial functions necessary for organizational operation are explored. The course is built around the topics of planning, organizing, directing, controlling and decision-making.

Principles of Marketing
, BS-MG 352-(3)-SP
This is a survey course where policies, practices and procedures of marketing within the private and public sector are learned. Emphasis is given to promotion, pricing, product and distribution.
Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing.

Principles of Sociology, SS-SO 202-G-(3)-FA
An introductory course dealing with social theory, processes, institutions, and problems, it emphasizes the impact society has on the individual. Designed for those desiring to major in the field as well as for others who want an understanding of the structure and functions of society.

Principles of Speech, CO-CO 211-G-(2)-FA, WI, SP
A study of the principles of the major types of speeches, including a variety of practical experience ranging from impromptu to formal. Emphasis is placed on speech preparation for delivery. It also serves the needs of ministry students as an introduction to public speaking/homiletics, where they will be asked to present a sermon as part of their practical experience. Required for graduation.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

Private Flying, AV-AF 102 (MA)-(3)-FA, SP
This course takes student pilot from Introduction to Aviation through the Private Pilot Certificate. Student must be currently taking Introduction to Aviation or have passed the FAA private pilot written test within the previous two years. A minimum of 40 hours of flight time required. Course completion is based on the student's obtaining the Private Pilot Certificate.
Prerequisite: Third Class Airman’s Medical Certificate.

Professional Ethics, PR-TH/BS-MG 363-G-(3)-FA
This is a study of the theory and practice of professional ethics. Cases and essays by noted thinkers are studied and discussed in-depth from a Christian perspective. Course will be tailored to individual student interests such as business, religion, etc. (Offered alternate years.)

Professional Practices in Education
This course is designed to enable candidates to engage in professional practices in their prospective schools. This would include, but not be limited to, resume’ building, initiating a job search, review of interview techniques, research professional expectations, and understanding compensation packages. Work ethics, morals, current issues in education, and the necessity of continuing education are covered, as well.

Psychology & Fundamentals of Learning, ED-CC 201 (4)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles, theories and methods associated with classroom learning. It examines the fundamental process associated with learning and motivation. Students will become familiar with current applications and practices found in contemporary education.

Psychology of Religion, SS-PY 490-(2)
This course will investigate the role of religion and its affects on beliefs, behavior, self- conception, motivation, emotions, and sociological interactions. Students will be challenged to investigate the psychological issues related to conversion, adherence, and ritual. (Directed Study)

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Racquetball/Bowling, SP-AC 130-G-(1)-FA

Racquetball/Weight Training, SP-AC 131-G-(1)-FA

Racquetball/Weight Training, SP-AC 137-G-(1)-FA

Radio Production, CO-CO 322-(3)-FA (on a three year cycle)
This course is a continuation in the area of broadcasting with a concentration in radio. Emphasis will be in actual broadcasting with the aid of new technology as well as standard radio broadcasting.

Readings in Psychology (directed study)

Recreational Facilities, SP-SH 410-(3)-SP
This course focuses on designing, planning and managing sports arenas and facilities. Prerequisites: Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise and Sport or Introduction to Sport Management.

Religious Drama, CO-TH 490-G-(3)-SP
A study of the development of church drama and a consideration of its place in the church today. Special problems of material, costuming and properties
are discussed. Recommended for ministry majors.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. (Offered on a 3-year cycle.)

Research Methods/Applied Statistics, SS-PY 310-(3)-SP
Designed to introduce students to psychological/sociological research methodology and design. This research process will be investigated by actively involving the student in developing research questions, hypotheses, evaluating ethical issues, collecting and analyzing data, and reporting research results. Depending on availability, student will be introduced to computer aided research tools.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology or SS-SO 202-G — General Sociology; Students are encouraged to first take SS-PY 209 Statistics. (Offered alternate years.)

Research Project

Research Project/Internship

Research Project/Practicum

Romans, PR-BI 306-G-(3)-SP
The study of this epistle emphasizes analysis and application of the teachings and theological themes presented in the Biblical text. The student is encouraged to interpret theologically as well as devotionally through word studies, topical and historical analysis, and open class discussion.

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Secondary Teaching Methods
The Secondary Teaching Methods course is designed to provide a foundation for classroom methodology and development and implementation to standards-based instructional activities, lessons, and assessments. Through unit development and microteaching, students will develop a working knowledge of pedagogy and state content standards.

Senior Project, CO-CO 490-(3)-DS
Project developed by the student with guidelines from the professor in his/her area of communication. Independently accomplished with evaluation from the professor.

Senior Project, CO-CO 490-(3)-FA, SP
Nature of coursework to be determined by instructor.

Senior Project (English)
The Senior Project is a directed study designed to allow students a substantial amount of time to continue the project they began in their Junior Project, allowing them a substantial amount of time to think through the organization and topic of their choice. Some previous projects have been a collection of original short stories, a screen play, a novel, and a nonfiction work about Jack Kerouac. Should students continue the Project into their second semester, they will polish the work and seek publication

Senior Recital, MU-SR 418-(0)
Students will prepare a minimum of 45 minutes of music with his/her applied music professor to be performed at a public recital, or submit an approved project by his/her music advisor.
Prerequisite: a minimum of 3 hours of upper division applied music.

Senior Seminar in English
This final course of English studies is designed to explore selected subjects (i.e., writers, literary forms, themes, etc.) within the context of current critical theory and to explore the integration of faith and learning in literary studies: to teach students to subvert and recreate culture.

Senior Seminar in Social Science, SS PY 491-(2)-SP
This course is the educational capstone for those majoring in the social sciences. It is designed to integrate the learning experience in preparation for further educational endeavors or professional placement. Critical thinking skills will be challenged as students prepare for the GRE and placement in either a school or profession.

Senior Seminar, PR-MN 491-(2)-SP
This seminar is required for all Bachelor of Science in Ministry majors. It is a senior “capstone” course. The course content includes: 1) creativity, critical thinking and decision-making; 2) resume and interview preparation; 3) life planning; and 4) summaries of ministry concentration.

Short Story Development, EN-LT 215-G (4)-WI
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the development and characteristics associated with the short story. Examination of technique and the cultural aspects of the short story are engaged. (3 year cycle)

Six to 12 Physical Education Methods
Study of effective teaching with emphasis on teaching methods, student learning time, classroom management, and program planning. This course includes a ten hour practicum placement in a secondary education classroom. The purpose of this course is to analyze the teaching methods utilized in effective instructions and to help students understand the essential elements of teaching physical education at the secondary level. It is a hands-on, practical means of introducing the students to activities and procedures related to secondary physical education.

Small Business Management, BS-MG 371-(3)-FA
The course is designed to provide an understanding of the administrative problems of small business through the study of organization, planning, communications, and control.

Social History of the 1960s, SS-HI 244-(1)-FA
A look at the turbulent sixties, with an integration of issues relating to the sexual revolution, rock music, civil rights, the rebellion to authority, the war in Vietnam, etc. (Offered alternate years.)

Social Problems and their Impact on the Workplace, EX-MG 350-(3)-T3
This course presents an analysis of major contemporary social problems especially in the United States. Particular attention is given to the problems of poverty, racism, sexism, drug and alcohol abuse, and illiteracy, and their impact on the contemporary workplace. Consideration is given to diverse sociological perspectives regarding the cause, consequences, and solutions to these problems.

Social Problems, SS-SO 306-(3)-SP
A close examination of major sociological problems such as those related to race, sexuality, the family, poverty, crime, drug usage, and the environment.
Prerequisite: SS-SO 202-G Principles of Sociology.(Offered alternate years.)

Social Psychology, SS-PY 320-(3)-WI or SP
The study of how the individual is influenced in his or her behavior, attitudes, perceptions, emotions, and thoughts by other people.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110- G— General Psychology or SS-SO 202-G— General Sociology. (Offered alternate years.)

Sociological Theory, SS-PY 490-(3)-DS
A review and analysis of historical sociological theory including the masters of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Pareto, Veblen, and others.
Prerequisite: SS-SO 202-G— Principles of Sociology.

Songwriting, MU-MS 304/404-G-(2)-SP
This course is designed to explore the art of songwriting. Students will receive classroom instruction, participate in directed study with faculty, artists and clinicians, as well as work in collaboration with each other to develop their use of form, melody, harmony, rhythm and lyric. Emphasis will be placed on the song as the vehicle for student’s own creative expression.
Prerequisites: MUS 204, or concurrent enrollment in MUS 204.

Sophomore Seminar in Social Science, SS-PY 291-(1)-SP
Designed as an introductory course into the field of the social sciences, students will become acquainted with possible professions related to the social sciences, discover educational paths available to them, become familiar with institutional resources and discuss the school's educational methods and objectives related to the social sciences. Specific attention will be placed on the mastery of APA writing skills in preparation for further study.

Special Topics in Sports Management, SP-SM 497-(3)-SP
Directed research course (Offered on demand.)

Spiritual Formation, EX-MN 319-(3)-T2
This course will explore the nature of spiritual formation. Different models concerning spiritual maturation will be investigated, with specific emphasis on the integration of ministry to children, youth, and adults. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate theories concerning cognitive and spiritual development. Experiential components will include personal experience with different approaches to prayer, spiritual disciplines and other classical/contemporary practices. A major emphasis will also be placed on the role and function of small groups in the spiritual formation process.

Sport Marketing, SP-SH 315-(3)-SP
This course focuses on the fundamentals of sports marketing and event management. Description of content includes, but is not limited to, historical development of sport marketing, special event and their use in sports, the role of the media and ticket sales and their use in promotions. The student will understand the four P’s of marketing correlated in the world of sports.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Sport Management

Sport Psychology, SP-SH 400-(3)-FA
An overview of essential physiological and psychological considerations involved in coaching teams.

Sports and Exercise Psychology, SS-PY 400-(2)-SP
An overview of essential physiological and psychological considerations involved in athletic competition and individual performance. Considerable attention is given to the cognitive functions related to optimum athletic functioning. Discussion focuses on collective and individual modalities and cognitions.

Sports Law, SP-SM 302-(3)-FA
Negligence liability; control of amateur, professional and school sports; violence/crowd; product liability; risk management; selected current issues.

Stage Craft, CO-TH 210-G-(2)-FA, WI, SP
Introduction to backstage crafts, including set construction, lighting, make-up and costume design.

Stage Craft II, CO-TH 310-G-(1-2)-FA, WI, SP
A continuation of the study of backstage crafts with specific projects in one of the production disciplines such as lighting, sound, decor or construction.

Stage Movement CO-TH 204-(3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the use of the body as a tool of the stage. Special focus will be place on elements such as dance, mime, stage fighting, as well as other theatrical elements. The student can expect to gain spatial awareness and attentiveness to physiological movement and expression.

Statistics, BS-MG 209-(3)-FA
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representation, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory and various significant tests of relationship, association, and correlation. Prerequisite: MA104 College Algebra

Statistics, SS-PY 209-(3)-FA
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representation, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory and various significant tests of relationship, association, and correlation. Prerequisite: MA 104 or permission of instructor.

Strategic Management, BS-MG 451-(3)-SP
This is the final capstone course for Accounting, Management and Small Business majors. A case method approach is used involving topics such strategic planning, policy and ethics, among others. Group work, a class presentation, discussion and participation are expected.

Strategic Planning, EX-MG 450-(3)-T4
This course introduces adult learners to various management planning models and techniques and applies these to business cases. It stresses the concepts of strategic planning and strategic management.

String Techniques, MU-MS 317-G-(1)-SP
This course is designed to develop the basic technique of playing the violin, viola, cello and double bass. Students will learn methods in playing, caring for and teaching these stringed instruments. Recommended for students pursing elementary and secondary music education.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Offered every other year.)

Studies in Christian Management, BS-MG 450-(3)-SP
This course serves as the capstone for the management/organizational leadership major. The student will have the opportunity to read a variety of contemporary authors writing on effective management and leadership, participate as part of a study team, and prepare and present his/her own philosophy of management and leadership.

Studies in Poetry, EN-LT 220-G-(3)
An in-depth study of different types of poetry and the characteristics of each. The course will include analysis and interpretation of the styles, techniques and forms of multiple genres.

Studio Production Techniques, MU-MS 279/379-G-(2, 3)-FA
This course offers further experience in multi-track studio production. This project-based course will center on a variety of recording projects, both student and professional. Prerequisite: MUS 179-G Intro to Music Technology

Study Technics, EN-CP-100-(1,2)-FA, SP
Instruction and practice in college level study skills; textbook reading and marking, note taking, test taking, time management, concentration and memorization. (Students in need of additional academic help see Guidance Center.)

Survey of Contemporary Mathematics, NS-MA 201-G-(3)-SP
This course includes a broad survey of math topics including (but not limited to) algebra, logic, geometry, functions, graphs and probability. The historical and cultural aspects of math as well as its importance to modern society are also studied. Recommended as a general education course.
Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 18 or M-103 or higher or instructor’s permission. (Offered on demand.)

Symphony Orchestra, MU-MP 151-G-(1)-SP
A full symphonic orchestra comprised of students and community members, this group performs two full concerts each year, one in the fall and one in the spring. This is the largest instrumental; group on campus. Standard orchestra literature is performed and students must be at intermediate level of proficiency.
Prerequisite: Approval of the conductor and/or concertmaster.

Systems and Theories of Psychology, SS-PY 490-(3)
This course reviews the history of psychology from early developments to contemporary developments. Particular attention will be directed to the development of Christian Psychology and its insights into the field of psychology.
Prerequisite: SS-PY 110-G— General Psychology. (Directed Study)

Systems Approach To Management, EX-MG 435-(3)-T1
Adult learners examine the formal and informal functions of organizations and analyze agencies or organizations based on a systems model. Adult learners will also analyze and solve organizational problems using a step-by-step method. This analysis will be applied to adult learners’ work-related independent study projects.

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Teaching as Ministry, PR-EM 321-(2)-FA
A study of the principles and practices of teaching in ministry.

Television Production, CO-CO 422-(3)-FA (On a three year cycle)
This course is a continuation in the area of broadcasting with a concentration in television. Emphasis will be in actual television production, learning new methods in technology as well as traditional methods.

Tennis/Bowling, SP-AC 135-G -(1)-FA, SP

Tennis/Weight Training, SP-AC 134-G-(1)-FA

The American Novel, EN-LT 415-G-(3)
Study of the development of the American novel from the 18th to the 21st centuries and how these works reflect and react to the culture of the time period in which they were written. The analysis and interpretation will include universal themes common to multiple cultures.

Theatre Performance I, II, III, IV, CO-TH 201/202/303/304-G-(1)-FA, WI, SP
A course that allows students the opportunity to use their talents on stage while continuing to learn and grow as an artist. Each student should gain confidence in their speaking abilities, as well as develop and improve on acting style and technics, gaining a better understanding of the process needed to develop a production from beginning to end.
Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.

Theatre Workshop-Directed Study, MU-TH 390/490-G -(1)-WI
Open to students who are interested in assisting with the production of the Interterm musical or play. Provides workshop experience in makeup, costuming, set design and construction, publicity, lighting, sound, props, etc. (See page 48.)

Theatrical Design, CO-TH 390-G-(3)-DS
Design project in one of the following areas of theatre: scenery, costumes or lighting. Works directly under the supervision of the theatre director in the development of the project.

Theology of the Holy Spirit, PR-TH 462-(3)-FA
The Wesleyan position of entire sanctification and the fullness of the Holy Spirit are emphasized in the course. The Holy Spirit is studied for a practical application in developing a spiritual ministry.
Prerequisite: PR 360 & 361 Introduction to Theology I & II

Theories In Leadership, EX-MG 341-(3)-T3
In the five weeks of this module, several theories will be explored that attempt to explain what leadership is and how to apply it to key areas, such as influencing individual behavior, group or team performance, and change. Additionally, the module will examine sources of power, motivational theory, and conflict resolution strategies.

Theory of Coaching, SP-SH 204-(2)-WI
A course for P.E. majors or others who may be interested in coaching. Students will learn how to organize, plan, and run an athletic program. Attention will be given to conditioning, practices, game preparation, etc. In addition, the course will be individualized for each sport the student may wish to coach.

Theory of Coaching: Baseball

Theory of Coaching: Basketball, SP-SH 305-(2)-SP
A course for physical education majors aimed at the development of people in the basketball coaching field. Students will learn to organize all aspects of a junior high or high school basketball program; develop strategies most effective for personnel in a basketball program; understand the role of psychology of coaching basketball, and understand the administrative role of a coach in a basketball program.

Theory of Coaching: Soccer, SP-SH 318-(2)

Theory of Coaching: Tennis, SP-SH 306-(2)-SP
A course for physical education majors. The objective of the course is to be able to teach the game of tennis, coach the game of tennis, organize tennis practices, make up and utilize a budget, operate home meets and tournaments, schedule for a season and improve one’s personal tennis playing skills.

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United States History I & II, SS-HI 105/106-G-(3, 3)-FA, SP
In the first semester the beginnings of our national history are surveyed, and carried through into the Civil War reconstruction. The second semester carries through to the present. Cause and effect as well as factual, social and political developments are given prime consideration, to provide a fuller understanding as to why our history has taken the course it has. Courses may be taken independently of each other.

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Varsity Sports, SP-VS 151/152
Instruction and participation in the following sports: (Elective credit given for every year of participation in a varsity sport.)

Varsity Baseball, SP-VS 151A/152A-(1)-SP
Varsity Basketball Women’s, SP-VS 151I/152I-(1)-FA, SP
Varsity Basketball-Men’s, SP-VS 151B/152B-(1)-FA, SP
Varsity Cheerleading, SP-VS 151J/152J-(1)-SP
Varsity Golf, SP-VS 151K/152K-(1)-SP
Varsity Soccer-Men’s, SP-VS 151C/152C-(1)-FA
Varsity Soccer-Women’s, SP-VS 151H/152H-(1)-FA
Varsity Softball, SP-VS 151G/152G-(1)-SP
Varsity Tennis, SP-VS 151D/152D-(1)-FA
Varsity Volleyball, SP-VS 151E/152E-(1)-FA

Vertebrate Zoology, NS-BI 202-G-(4)-SP
A study of the morphology, physiology, and behavior of the vertebrate animals stressing comparative anatomy; evolutionary an creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences.
Prerequisite- NS BI 101-G or permission from the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

Vocal Literature and Pedagogy, MU-MS 327 (3)
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of vocal pedagogy by reviewing the historical development, as well as contemporary advances, associated with vocal training. Attention will be given to the physiological principles related to proper vocal technique, common vocal problem and their appropriate responses, vocalizations, appropriate repertoire development, as well as other topics associated with effective vocal training.

Vocal Pedagogy and Diction, MU-MS 410-G-(3)-FA
This course is an examination and evaluation of methods and literature used for teaching voice at all levels. A study of teaching techniques through both observation and teaching of private students. Fundamentals of technique in articulation and pronunciation as applied to singing in Italian, French, German, Ecclesiastical Latin and English. Designed to give students a practical working knowledge of a profession that is in demand.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, minimum of two semesters of private voice lessons, and consent of instructor. (On demand)

Voice Class, U-MS 121/122-G-(1)-FA, SP
A study of the fundamental singing technics including breath-control, tone production, resonance, and diction. Application to song material.

Voice Practicum, MU-MS 295,395-G-(1)-SP
The course is designed to allow the advanced voice student to apply technics learned in private lessons to beginning students under the supervision of an experienced teacher. The student will give a 30 minute lesson to at least two students per week. The students to be taught are selected by college voice instructors and vary in ability and age level.

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Web Page Design, BS-CP 337-(3)-SP
This course is an introduction to the Internet, with the emphasis on learning the basics of designing web pages. The student will be introduced to HTML and JAVA, with the purpose of building one's own web site.
Prerequisite: Keyboarding skill, BUS 235 and at least Sophomore standing.

Wind Ensemble

Wisdom Literature & Psalms, PR-BI 304-G-(4)-WI
The four wisdom books (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon) and the Psalter are studied with attention given to cultural background, literary forms and hermeneutic framework. (Offered alternate years.)

Women in Ministry, PR-MN 327-(2)-FA
The course will help students define the aspects of a woman’s involvement in a variety of ministries and to define advantages and disadvantages to being a woman in ministry. Psychological and sociological issues will be explored along with each student’s strengths and abilities as they pursue their area of ministry. Prominent women in the Bible and history
will be studied, a service project will be required and each student will be assigned a mentor.

Woodwind Ensemble I,II, MU-EN 157/357-G-(1)-FA, SP
Wind Ensemble is a chamber sized performance group, i.e. one to two players per part.

Woodwind Technics, MU-MS 314-G-(1)-FA
A study of principal woodwind instruments. Students will learn methods in playing, caring for and teaching them. (Offered every other year.)

World Geography, SS-GE 113-G-(3)-SP
A general study to acquaint the student with the world's major physical features, geographic regions, and people groups, and their effects upon the American culture. (Offered alternate years.)

World Religions, PR-PH 265-G-(4)-WI
A course on gaining an understanding of the philosophy, theology and principles of the main World Religions. The student will be directed to do study in comparison and contrast and to use critical thinking in grasping the basic position of each religion. A Biblical Worldview will be discussed in relationship to the view expressed by each world religion.

World Religions, SS-SO 265-(3)
This course provides introduces the student to the major religions that exist in the world today, focusing on an exploration of their origins, development, and adaptation within the context of contemporary culture. Religions might include: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Mormonism, Jehovah Witnesses, Scientology, etc. (Offered irregularly)

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Youth Ministry I, PR-YM 222-(3)-FA
This course emphasizes a strategy for ministry with youth. Biblical principles are studied and applied as essential ingredients for a solid foundation in youth ministry.

Youth Ministry II
, PR-YM 323-(2)-SP
This course is specifically designed to help the student understand the administration of Youth Ministries on a local level. It deals with the practical side of doing ministry in today’s culture. (Offered alternate years.)