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Biology

Biology Core

An introductory lab science course which includes a survey of the major plant groups with emphasis on taxonomy and basic concepts of botany. This is a general education course designed to provide a foundation in plant biology for those interested in further study in the sciences. (Offered alternate years)

This is a general inorganic chemistry course and includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: High school chemistry NS-CH 102 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

This is the second-level of a course designed as survey of inorganic chemistry, which includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: NS-CH 111 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

The first course (one semester) of a three-semester sequence in calculus including studies of graphs, functions, limits, differentiation and applications of differentiation, integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 105, minimum Math ACT score of 20, or instructor permission.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra-based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include mechanics and fluids. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 104 College Algebra or permission of the instructor. Lab is required.

Critical thinking and the use of reasoning are vital to the person who wishes to know the truth and apply it to daily living. To be fully engaged in the process of living and interacting with other people requires the ability to reason logically and think critically. Students undertake both individual and group learning experiences to sharpen and focus their reasoning and thinking skills applied to: a) Generally- Christian perspective, and b) Specifically- science inquiry and reasoning.

This course is offered to natural science majors and liberal studies majors with science concentrations as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Choose One

This independent study is designed to challenge the student in the expansion and integration of acquired coursework and knowledge. Specifically, the course will challenge the student to pursue a topic and begin research under the supervision of a faculty member.

This independent study is designed to provide the student with on-the-job training, under the tutelage and evaluation of a practitioner. The specific elements of the internship will be decided upon with a faculty advisor and articulated in a learner contract. The student is required to complete 40 hours of work for each credit hour.

Choose at Least One

A study of the chemical and physical organization of cells, development, genetics, and a survey of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative anatomy, morphology, and physiology. Also included is a study of evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101- G or permission from the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

A study of the morphology, physiology, and behavior of the vertebrate animals stressing comparative anatomy and evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. (Offered alternate years)

Choose at Least One

The course is designed to introduce students to basic ecological principles and the wide diversity of habitats, animal life forms, and behavior patterns. It is a lab/field-oriented, upper-division course, but is open to all majors. Prerequisites: NS-BI 101 or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

A travel course (about 4,000 miles) involving camping and field studies for 3 1/2 weeks in New Mexico and Arizona. This course covers basic ecological principles unique to the Southwestern U.S. Visits are made to unique areas of biological significance such as Carlsbad Caverns, White Sands National Monument, Saguaro National Park, the Grand Canyon, and others. It is designed for both science and non-science majors. Prerequisite NS-BI 100 (or higher) or instructor permission. (Offered every four years during May-Term)

This course is designed as a hands-on lab experience and includes travel, camping, and intensive field study. Biological points of interest include Sanibel/Captiva islands, Corkscrew Cypress Swamp, Everglades National Park, and the Florida Keys. It is designed for both science and non-science majors. Prerequisite NS-BI 100 (or higher) and permission of instructor. (Offered every four years during Mid-Term)

Elective Pool - 3 Needed

A course designed to introduce the student to the interrelationships between organisms and their environment with emphasis on how man affects these interactions. Environmental issues such as pollution, resource use, loss of biodiversity, etc. are discussed in light of economic, political, and cultural influences. This is a general education science course for non-majors; however it is useful for majors interested in environmental biology. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. (Offered alternate years)

An introduction to the principles and concepts of the biological sciences. Coverage includes principles of cell biology, heredity, ecology, creation/evolution issues, and a survey of living things. This course is intended for non-science majors although it may also serve as a foundational course for biology majors.

The first in a series of two courses designed to study the gross and micro structure and function of the major systems of the human body. This course will focus primarily on support and movement systems, communication, control, and integrative systems. This course is designed for students who need an introduction to anatomy and physiology. This includes those pursuing pre-medicine, pre-nursing, pre-physical therapy, pre-medical technology, sports science majors and others who have an interest in the material. Prerequisites: Minimum of C in NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. Recommended: NS-CH 102 or NS-CH 111.

The second in a series of two courses designed to study the gross and micro structure and function of the major systems of the human body. This course will focus primarily on endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This course is designed for students who need an introduction to anatomy and physiology. This includes those pursuing pre-medicine, pre-nursing, pre-physical therapy, pre-medical technology, physical education majors, and others who have an interest in the material. Prerequisites: Minimum of C in NS-BI 204.

This course covers basic human nutritional requirements necessary for good health throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is placed on chemical makeup and sources of nutrients and how they are utilized by the body. Additional topics include weight control, nutritional information sources, nutrition, and disease. This course is especially for those interested in allied health careers, family nutrition, or social service. Course fee attached.

This course covers behavior and activity of microorganisms more or less common in the natural environment. Attention is given to bacteria in milk, water, and sewage. Techniques of staining, culturing, and isolating microorganisms are covered. Prerequisite: NS-BI 101, NS-CH 102, or NS-CH 111. (Offered alternate years)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and applications of classical, molecular, and population genetics. Laboratory experiences include work with transmission genetics, Drosophila studies, and techniques of DNA manipulation. Prerequisites: NS-BI 202 (or higher) and NS-CH 111 or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

Chemistry

Chemistry Core

This is a general inorganic chemistry course and includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: High school chemistry NS-CH 102 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

This is the second-level of a course designed as survey of inorganic chemistry, which includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: NS-CH 111 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

The first course (one semester) of a three-semester sequence in calculus including studies of graphs, functions, limits, differentiation and applications of differentiation, integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 105, minimum Math ACT score of 20, or instructor permission.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include mechanics and fluids. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 104 College Algebra or permission of the instructor. Lab is required.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include thermodynamics, electricity, and optics. Prerequisite: NS-PH 205. Lab is required.

Critical thinking and the use of reasoning are vital to the person who wishes to know the truth and apply it to daily living. To be fully engaged in the process of living and interacting with other people requires the ability to reason logically and think critically. Students undertake both individual and group learning experiences to sharpen and focus their reasoning and thinking skills applied to: a) Generally- Christian perspective; and b) Specifically- science inquiry and reasoning.

This course is offered to natural science majors and liberal studies majors with science concentrations as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Choose at Least One

This independent study is designed to challenge the student in the expansion and integration of acquired coursework and knowledge. Specifically, the course will challenge the student to pursue a topic and begin research under the supervision of a faculty member.

This independent study is designed to provide the student with on-the-job training, under the tutelage and evaluation of a practitioner. The specific elements of the internship will be decided upon with a faculty advisor and articulated in a learner contract. The student is required to complete 40 hours of work for each credit hour.

Choose at Least One

A study of the chemical and physical organization of cells, development, genetics, and a survey of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative anatomy, morphology, and physiology. Also included is a study of evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101- G or permission from the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

A study of the morphology, physiology, and behavior of the vertebrate animals stressing comparative anatomy and evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. (Offered alternate years)

An introductory lab science course which includes a survey of the major plant groups with emphasis on taxonomy and basic concepts of botany. This is a general education course designed to provide a foundation in plant biology for those interested in further study in the sciences. (Offered alternate years)

Elective Pool - 4 Needed

The first course in a two semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used. Prerequisites: NS-CH 111 and NS-CH 112. Course fee attached. (Offered alternate years)

The second course in a two-semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used. Prerequisites: NS-CH 311. Course fee attached. (Offered alternate years)

This course is designed as an introduction to the chemical process associated with the form and function of living matter and will include coursework related to acidity, alkalinity, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, as well as other associated topics.

Designed as a survey of metabolic and nutritional functions in relation to biosynthesis and organic functioning. The course will introduce the student to the chemical interactions associated with nutritive values and functioning. Course fee attached.

The student will be introduced to complex methods of inorganic quantitative analysis. Topics will include methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis utilizing instrumental methods. Course fee attached.

The student will further develop mastery of the periodic properties of the elements and their associated compounds, as well as develop familiarity with their interactions and reactions. Course fee attached.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the physics of chemical reactions. Topics will range from chemical thermodynamics; kinetic theory of gases; properties of solutions, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, biophysical spectroscopy, intermolecular forces, macromolecules, and statistical thermodynamics. Lab is required. Course fee attached.

Health Science

Health Science Core

This is a general inorganic chemistry course and includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: High school chemistry NS-CH 102 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

This is the second-level of a course designed as survey of inorganic chemistry, which includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: NS-CH 111 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

The first course (one semester) of a three-semester sequence in calculus including studies of graphs, functions, limits, differentiation and applications of differentiation, integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 105, minimum Math ACT score of 20, or instructor permission.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include mechanics and fluids. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 104 College Algebra or permission of the instructor. Lab is required.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include thermodynamics, electricity, and optics. Prerequisite: NS-PH 205. Lab is required.

Critical thinking and the use of reasoning are vital to the person who wishes to know the truth and apply it to daily living. To be fully engaged in the process of living and interacting with other people requires the ability to reason logically and think critically. Students undertake both individual and group learning experiences to sharpen and focus their reasoning and thinking skills applied to: a) Generally- Christian perspective; and b) Specifically- science inquiry and reasoning.

This course is offered to natural science majors and liberal studies majors with science concentrations as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Choose at Least One

This independent study is designed to challenge the student in the expansion and integration of acquired coursework and knowledge. Specifically, the course will challenge the student to pursue a topic and begin research under the supervision of a faculty member.

This course is offered to natural science majors and liberal studies majors with science concentrations as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Choose at Least One

A study of the chemical and physical organization of cells, development, genetics, and a survey of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative anatomy, morphology, and physiology. Also included is a study of evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101- G or permission from the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

A study of the morphology, physiology, and behavior of the vertebrate animals stressing comparative anatomy and evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. (Offered alternate years)

An introductory lab science course which includes a survey of the major plant groups with emphasis on taxonomy and basic concepts of botany. This is a general education course designed to provide a foundation in plant biology for those interested in further study in the sciences. (Offered alternate years)

Elective Pool - 4 Needed

The first in a series of two courses designed to study the gross and micro structure and function of the major systems of the human body. This course will focus primarily on support and movement systems, communication, control, and integrative systems. This course is designed for students who need an introduction to anatomy and physiology. This includes those pursuing pre-medicine, pre-nursing, pre-physical therapy, pre-medical technology, sports science majors, and others who have an interest in the material. Prerequisites: Minimum of C in NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. Recommended: NS-CH 102 or NS-CH 111.

The second in a series of two courses designed to study the gross and micro structure and function of the major systems of the human body. This course will focus primarily on endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This course is designed for students who need an introduction to anatomy and physiology. This includes those pursuing pre-medicine, pre-nursing, pre-physical therapy, pre-medical technology, physical education majors, and others who have an interest in the material. Prerequisites: Minimum of C in NS-BI 204.

This course covers behavior and activity of microorganisms more or less common in the natural environment. Attention is given to bacteria in milk, water, and sewage. Techniques of staining, culturing, and isolating microorganisms are covered. Prerequisite: NS-BI 101, NS-CH 102 or NS-CH 111. (Offered alternate years)

This course is designed as an introduction to the chemical process associated with the form and function of living matter and will include course work related to acidity, alkalinity, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, as well as other associated topics.

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and applications of classical, molecular, and population genetics. Laboratory experiences include work with transmission genetics, Drosophila studies, and techniques of DNA manipulation. Prerequisites: NS-BI 202 (or higher) and NS-CH 111 or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

The first course in a two-semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used. Prerequisites: NS-CH 111 and NS-CH 112. Course fee attached. (Offered alternate years)

The second course in a two-semester sequence of organic chemistry. An emphasis on mechanisms and organic reactions is central to the study. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the preparation and synthesis, purification, and then analysis of organic compounds. Instrumentation and modern laboratory apparatus will be used. Prerequisites: NS-CH 311. Course fee attached. (Offered alternate years)

The student will be introduced to complex methods of inorganic quantitative analysis. Topics will include methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis utilizing instrumental methods. Course fee attached.

The student will further develop mastery of the periodic properties of the elements and their associated compounds, as well as develop familiarity with their interactions and reactions. Course fee attached.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the physics of chemical reactions. Topics will range from chemical thermodynamics; kinetic theory of gases; properties of solutions, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, biophysical spectroscopy, intermolecular forces, macromolecules, and statistical thermodynamics. Lab is required. Course fee attached.

Mathematics

Mathematics Core

This is a general inorganic chemistry course and includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: High school chemistry NS-CH 102 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

The first course (one semester) of a three-semester sequence in calculus including studies of graphs, functions, limits, differentiation and applications of differentiation, integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 105, minimum Math ACT score of 20, or instructor permission.

A continuation of Calculus I. The course includes a study of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 111.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include mechanics and fluids. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 104 College Algebra or permission of the instructor. Lab is required.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence, which completes an eight-semester hour college algebra based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level course supporting science majors not needing a calculus based physics course such as those going into pre-med. However, for those planning to take the MCAT, both semesters are needed. Topics covered include thermodynamics, electricity, and optics. Prerequisite: NS-PH 205. Lab is required.

Critical thinking and the use of reasoning are vital to the person who wishes to know the truth and apply it to daily living. To be fully engaged in the process of living and interacting with other people requires the ability to reason logically and think critically. Students undertake both individual and group learning experiences to sharpen and focus their reasoning and thinking skills applied to: a) Generally- Christian perspective; and b) Specifically- science inquiry and reasoning.

This course is offered to natural science majors and liberal studies majors with science concentrations as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Choose at Least One

This independent study is designed to challenge the student in the expansion and integration of acquired coursework and knowledge. Specifically, the course will challenge the student to pursue a topic and begin research under the supervision of a faculty member.

This independent study is designed to provide the student with on-the-job training, under the tutelage and evaluation of a practitioner. The specific elements of the internship will be decided upon with a faculty advisor and articulated in a learner contract. The student is required to complete 40 hours of work for each credit hour.

Choose at Least One

A study of the chemical and physical organization of cells, development, genetics, and a survey of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative anatomy, morphology, and physiology. Also included is a study of evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101- G or permission from the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

A study of the morphology, physiology, and behavior of the vertebrate animals stressing comparative anatomy and evolutionary and creationist theories and concepts. It is designed to provide a foundation in animal biology for all those interested in further study in life sciences. Prerequisite- NS-BI 101 or instructor permission. (Offered alternate years)

An introductory lab science course which includes a survey of the major plant groups with emphasis on taxonomy and basic concepts of botany. This is a general education course designed to provide a foundation in plant biology for those interested in further study in the sciences. (Offered alternate years)

Elective Pool - 4 Needed

This is the second-level of a course designed as survey of inorganic chemistry, which includes detailed studies of the basics of chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory activities support the classroom topics and also include safety, lab techniques and procedures, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: NS-CH 111 or instructor’s approval. Course fee attached.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence which completes a 10-semester hour calculus based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level calculus based course supporting engineering, mathematics, and science majors. Topics covered include mechanics and fluid mechanics. Prerequisite: NS-MA 111 or permission of the instructor. Lab is required.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence which completes a 10-semester hour calculus based physics block. It meets the requirement for a basic professional level calculus based course supporting engineering, mathematics, and science majors. Topics covered include thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: NS-PH 215. Lab is required.

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