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Psychology

Psychology Core

A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representation, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, association, and correlation. Prerequisite: Minimum of C in NS-MA 104 or permission of instructor.

A general introduction to psychology with special emphasis upon psychology as a basic science dealing with human behavior. The student is introduced to sensation, perception, learning, personality disorders, psychotherapy, and social psychology. Designed for both majors and non-majors.

Designed to introduce students to the use of statistical models and formulas used in research methodology and design. This research process will be investigated by actively involving the student in developing research questions, hypotheses development, evaluating ethical issues, collecting and analyzing data, and reporting research results. Statistical topics will include a hands-on approach to correlations, ANOVA, t-tests, regression, probability, standard deviation, central tendency, evaluation of curves, as well as other topics. Use of EXCEL and SPSS is required. Prerequisite: NS-MA 209 or SS-PY 210. (Offered online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

An introduction to the theoretical approaches designed to explain the development of personality. While the purpose of the course is to engage contemporary theories and application of personality psychology, historical theories will also be explored. Prerequisite: SS-PY 110 general psychology. (Offered on-ground and alternate years)

The study of how the individual is influenced in his or her behavior, attitudes, perceptions, emotions, and thoughts by other people. (Offered online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

Students will be exposed to the DSM-IV (diagnostic manual) and all psychological disorders from multiple perspectives. They will study many disorders, all disorders presently listed in the DSM-V, as well as case studies of disorders. Prerequisite: SS-PY 110 general psychology (Offered on-ground and alternate years)

This guided study is designed to challenge the student in the expansion and integration of acquired coursework and knowledge. Specifically, the course will challenge the student to pursue a topic and begin research and organization under the supervision of a faculty member.

The capstone course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills, and abilities obtained through his or her academic journey. The outcome of the course will include two artifacts to include in the student portfolio. The first is a continuation of the research project, which will result in the development of a thesis that demonstrates the ability to review, analyze, and synthesize information and data related to a hypothesis or research question. The second is a comprehensive case study applying therapeutic techniques, theories, and perspectives. This course is the educational capstone for those majoring in the psychology/social sciences. It is designed to integrate the learning experience in preparation for further educational endeavors or professional placement. Prerequisite: SS-PY 493.

Designed as an introductory course into scientific writing, students will become familiar with APA writing skills. During this course students will produce a series of papers designed to master scientific writing skills while at the same time becoming acquainted with possible professions related to their major. Students will discover educational paths available to them, become familiar with institutional resources and explore personal strengths and weaknesses related to future success.

Elective Pool - 6 Needed

Pre-Law (Liberal Studies)

Pre-Law Core

A course focused on our national history, from the pre-Columbian era through the 20th Century. Students will identify and describe information related to: the colonial period, the revolutionary era, the Confederation, the Constitution, early national developments, slavery and sectionalism, the Civil War/Reconstruction, industrialization, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War era. Students will summarize themes in American diversity, culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and U.S. foreign policy. Students will explain causes and effects of social and political developments. (Offered alternate years)

A critical examination of the formal and informal institutions of American government—congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, political parties, media, and interest groups—in order to understand the political policy and action of our nation. (Offered alternate years)

Students are introduced to U.S. and world history by investigating how the past has shaped the present and how personal involvement with the present can shape the future. The role of personal responsibility and its relationship to local, state, national, and global society is discussed at the historical and contemporary level. Specific emphasis is placed on major historical events, political participation, the Constitution, Bill of Rights (and other foundational documents), economics, social justice, and social ethics. (Offered online and on-ground)

Introduction to the historical backgrounds, agencies and processes, purposes and function, ethics, administration, and technical problems of the criminal justice system. (Offered on-ground and alternate years)

Students will become knowledgeable on law within the legal system. They will be introduced into the field of law and its impact on society and exposed to the historical precedents and to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a law office of their interest (according to availability) to observe and interact with professionals in the legal field as part of the course work. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to recognize which theories relate to law and current issues and which do not. There will be an additional fee. Prerequisites: approval from the instructor and be in good standing with the college. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

This course examines substantive criminal law: principles of criminal law and analysis of various offenses, parties to crime, and defenses. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

This course is offered to any student majoring in a social science (other than psychology) as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

Interdisciplinary Core

This course includes in-depth discussion of current communication topics including workplace diversity, technology, correspondence applications, proposals, business plans, visual aids, teamwork, interpersonal communications, listening, nonverbal messages, presentation skills, and employment communication. Positive, neutral, goodwill, negative, and persuasive letters will be prepared. Prerequisite: junior or senior level standing and one lower-level WI course. (Offered spring)

Business law studies the history, background, sources, and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporations, and other legal entities. As a part of this module particular emphasis will be placed upon the laws governing contracts, creditors’ rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships, and corporations. Today’s managers need to understand the basic legal concepts to avoid costly courtroom problems and other legal issues. (Offered fall)

This is a study of the theory and practice of professional ethics. Cases and essays by noted thinkers are studied and discussed in-depth from a Christian perspective. Course will be tailored to individual student interests such as business, religion, etc. (Offered even years spring)

An intensive exploration of a genre of subject matter. The course provides the student the opportunity to apply critical thinking and research skills with the intention of developing and authoring a unique text, prose, copy, or piece. This course is the upper-level writing intensive and Capstone course.

This course will concentrate on the advanced learning of mechanics and developing ideas of the speaker. Emphasis will be on the development and delivery of persuasive and argumentative speeches. Prerequisite: CO-CO 211. (Offered alternate years)

An introductory course dealing with social theory, processes, institutions, and problems, and it emphasizes the impact society has on the individual. Designed for those desiring to major in the field as well as for others who want an understanding of the structure and functions of society.

A general introduction to psychology with special emphasis upon psychology as a basic science dealing with human behavior. The student is introduced to sensation, perception, learning, personality disorders, psychotherapy, and social psychology. Designed for both majors and non-majors.

Choose at Least One

A survey of the applications of psychology in industry, the course topics include personnel selection, training, and performance appraisal; organizational psychology and job design; human engineering of the industrial workplace; and issues of employee motivation, morale, safety, and health. An emphasis is placed on the application of psychological principles to the understanding of organizational effects on individual and group behavior. (Offered online only)

This course examines the psychological and sociological variables important in understanding individual motivation, group functioning, change, creativity, organizational design, conflict, and leadership in organizations. Particular attention is given to the application of leadership and management principles within the organizational structure. (Offering on-ground and alternate years)

Elective Pool - 6 Needed

An introduction to three major genres of literature (short story, poetry, and drama) through reading, viewing, discussing, and analyzing works from these genres. Study will focus on the unique elements and characteristics of each genre as illustrated through individual works.

An introduction to three major genres of literature (short story, poetry, and drama) through reading, viewing, discussing, and analyzing works from these genres. Study will focus on the unique elements and characteristics of each genre as illustrated through individual works.

A critical study of representative historical plays, tragedies, and comedies with emphasis on the unique characteristics of Shakespeare’s style. The course includes an analysis of individual plays and a research project. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

A chronological overview of the development of American literature from the founding of the country to the present. It will cover all genres of literature and include critical reading and analytical writing. Prerequisite: EN-LT 205 or permission of the instructor. (Alternate years)

This course is a chronological survey of the development of literature in Great Britain, from the Middle Ages to the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, and is designed to introduce students to English literature with its history not only of steady development and continuity but also of sudden revolution and astonishing originality. Prerequisite: EN-LT 205 or permission of the instructor.

This course is a chronological survey of the development of literature in Great Britain from the Romantic Period to the Twentieth Century and after, and is designed to introduce students to English literature with its history not only of steady development and continuity, but also of sudden revolution and astonishing originality. Prerequisite: EN-LT 205 or permission of the instructor.

6 Pre- Law Credits Needed

*Choose 6 credits from any business, management, composition, literature, history, psychology, sociology, political science, criminal justice, or communication course

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice Core

This course is offered to any student majoring in a social science (other than psychology) as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.).

The development of U.S. policing, stressing the relationship of police to local politics and the effects of civil service, reform movements, and technological change. (Online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

Introduction to the historical backgrounds, agencies and processes, purposes and function, ethics, administration, and technical problems of the criminal justice system. (Offered on-ground and alternate years)

Students will become knowledgeable on law within the legal system. They will be introduced into the field of law and its impact on society and exposed to the historical precedents and to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a law office of their interest (according to availability) to observe and interact with professionals in the legal field as part of the course work. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to recognize which theories relate to law and current issues and which do not. There will be an additional fee. Prerequisites: approval from the instructor and be in good standing with the college. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

Students will become knowledgeable on law within the legal system. They will be introduced into the field of law and its impact on society and exposed to the historical precedents and to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a law office of their interest (according to availability) to observe and interact with professionals in the legal field as part of the course work. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to recognize which theories relate to law and current issues and which do not. There will be an additional fee. Prerequisites: approval from the instructor and be in good standing with the college. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

Overview of general principles of forensic science, techniques, equipment, and methodologies as used in crime laboratories. Focus on fingerprint and firearm identification, trace evidence (hair, fiber, paint, and glass), blood, DNA evidence, forensic documentation examination, crime scene kits, and forensic microscopy. (Online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

This course examines substantive criminal law: principles of criminal law and analysis of various offenses, parties to crime, and defenses. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

This course provides an introduction to the science of criminal investigation. The course will consist of lectures and class discussion, covering the historical origins and evolution of detective/investigative work, then the current method of solving crime, which involves the science and art of investigating crime. Current scientific methods and how they are used in various investigations will be discussed. A “realistic” approach will be maintained to solving crime and how cases are prepared for prosecution. (On-ground only) (Offered alternate years)

The purpose is to become knowledgeable on current correctional subsystems within the larger criminal justice system. The student will be introduced into the field of corrections and its impact on society and will be exposed to the historical precedents to the most current programs and practices. In an academic setting, the latest programs and research will be explored. In a practical setting, students will be assigned to a correctional facility/office of their interest (and availability) to observe and interact with professionals in this field as part of the course work. At the conclusion, students should be able to recognize what theories relating to corrections apply to current issues and those that do not. There will be an additional fee. Prerequisites: approval from the instructor and be in good standing with the college. (Offered on-ground and on demand)

This course is a study of crime as a form of deviant behavior, nature and extent of crime, past and present theories, evaluation of prevention, control and treatment programs. (Online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

An organizational management and systems approach to the study of police administration. Emphasizes the administration of various police function, organizational structures, resources management, operational techniques, professional ethics, and leadership principles and their implications for generalized and specialized units. (Online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

The study of how the individual is influenced in his or her behavior, attitudes, perceptions, emotions, and thoughts by other people. (Offered online and on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

An introductory course dealing with social theory, processes, institutions, and problems, it emphasizes the impact society has on the individual. Designed for those desiring to major in the field as well as for others who want an understanding of the structure and functions of society.

3 Criminal Justice Electives Needed

Elective Pool

Business law studies the history, background, sources, and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporations, and other legal entities. As a part of this module particular emphasis will be placed upon the laws governing contracts, creditors’ rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships, and corporations. Today’s managers need to understand the basic legal concepts to avoid costly courtroom problems and other legal issues. (Offered fall)

Students will be exposed to the DSM-IV (diagnostic manual) and all psychological disorders from multiple perspectives. They will study many disorders, all disorders presently listed in the DSM-V, as well as case studies of disorders. Prerequisite: SS-PY 110 general psychology. (Offered on-ground and alternate years)

A close examination of major sociological problems such as those related to race, sexuality, the family, poverty, crime, drug usage, and the environment. Prerequisite: SS-SO 202 — Principles of sociology. (Offered on demand)

History

History Core

This is a survey course covering basic principles for both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics studies the way in which individual economic agents such as workers, consumers, households, and business firms make decisions. Macroeconomics addresses issues pertaining to the aggregate economic principles with practical examples to give students a better understanding of the role economics plays in society.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of world civilizations from the earliest cultures through the modern era. Students will describe and defend, at times through research, writing, and possibly presentations, developments on themes such as the emergence and change of early societies, political and legal systems, religious and philosophical systems, and economic systems and trade. Students will explicate developments related to concepts such as absolutism and constitutionalism, growth of nation states, the Enlightenment, imperialism, classical liberalism, revolutions, industrialization, global conflicts, and globalism. Learners will compare and contrast themes across time and geographical regions. (Offered alternate years)

A course focused on our national history, from the pre-Columbian era through the 20th Century. Students will identify and describe information related to: the colonial period, the revolutionary era, the Confederation, the Constitution, early national developments, slavery and sectionalism, the Civil War/Reconstruction, industrialization, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War era. Students will summarize themes in American diversity, culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and U.S. foreign policy. Students will explain causes and effects of social and political developments. (Offered alternate years)

A general study to acquaint the student with the world’s major physical features, geographic regions, and people groups, and their effects upon the American culture.

An introductory course dealing with social theory, processes, institutions, and problems, it emphasizes the impact society has on the individual. Designed for those desiring to major in the field as well as for others who want an understanding of the structure and functions of society.

A critical examination of the formal and informal institutions of American government—congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, political parties, media and interest groups—in order to understand the political policy and action of our nation. (Offered alternate years)

Students are introduced to U.S. and world history by investigating how the past has shaped the present and how personal involvement with the present can shape the future. The role of personal responsibility and its relationship to local, state, national, and global society is discussed at the historical and contemporary level. Specific emphasis is placed on major historical events, political participation, the Constitution, Bill of Rights (and other foundational documents), economics, social justice, and social ethics. (Offered online and on-ground)

This is a survey of the history of the Christian movement from New Testament times to modern times, focusing on key movements, critical issues, outstanding leaders, and important turning points. The student will be expected to be able to differentiate between key beliefs in Christian orthodoxy relative to their appearance in historical context.

This course is a survey of history in the last third of the century. Specific attention will be given to developments in regions, which have seen the greatest changes and impact on world events: Europe; the Middle East; the Far East, especially China. (Offered alternate years)

A survey of Kansas history from prehistoric to modern times. Focus is on social, economic, military, and political history. (Offered on demand)

Beginning with the treatment of Native Americans by Spanish and English colonists, this course will proceed through the treatment of African slaves, and include perspectives on the experience of Hispanic and Asian immigrants. Social, economic, and legal perspectives will be emphasized. (Offered alternate years)

Designed as an introductory course to political theory, this course will expose the student to political philosophy and its influence on how societies interpret the role of humanity and its governing bodies. (Offered on-ground) (Offered alternate years)

Selected themes and events introduced in SS-HI 115 Survey of United States History will be covered in greater depth. Students will understand and analyze themes such as the influence of the Protestant Reformation on the Colonies, the uniqueness of the American Experiment, regional differences (pre and post-civil war to the current time), the explosion of the American economic engine, social reforms, and political innovations (1880s-1930s), the change from isolation to being a world leader, the U.S. as a defender of democracy and free enterprise, our post-modern society (1960s-80s), and the U.S in a global marketplace. (Offered alternate years)

An overview of European history from the late middle ages through the unification of Europe. Students will interpret, among other developments, the Reformation, Renaissance, Enlightenment, the age of revolution, and unification of states. Learners will analyze primarily the political, military, and religious domains, though social and economic developments will be addressed. (Offered alternate years)

Historians bring their own assumptions, political inclinations, and cultural biases to this process. They “construct” the past, sometimes providing a false sense of order and coherence to events which were chaotic and ‘accidental’ and about which historical information is incomplete and fragmentary. They determine what constitutes acceptable evidence and the questions and topics that are worth investigating. So this course studies how historians have written about the past, including how their assumptions, questions, methods, and expected quality of evidence have changed over time. Beginning with early Greek and Biblical historians, the course will progress to recent debates concerning the discipline. Students will define which historiographic tradition is closest to their own thinking and values and assess its possibilities and shortcomings. As a senior capstone course, the student is required to do a significant amount of writing to display their abilities as a researcher and writer of history. (Offered alternate years)

This course is offered to history majors as a “capstone” course to their undergraduate studies. It is designed to allow the student to review, synthesize, and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired from previous courses, both general education and major courses. It is also intended to prepare the student for transition from college to post-college life (graduate school, job, etc.). (Offered alternate years)

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